Saturday, October 9, 2021

The Daily Bible Readings for Saturday, October 9, 2021

 

The Daily Bible Readings
Saturday, October 9, 2021
Psalm 22:1-15; Job 20:1-29; Matthew 15:1-9
with commentaries from Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

Introduction
In today’s lectionary readings, the Spirit of Christ, which was in the prophets, testifies in our psalm reading, clearly and fully, the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow. In our reading in Job, in his second speech, Zophar insisted that Job’s striking defense in the previous chapters made him anxious and caused turmoil within him. Job’s speech upset him. In our gospel reading, in response to the challenge by the teachers about the disciples’ violation of their traditions, Jesus rebuked the teachers for their hypocrisy. In our verse of the day, Israel was instructed not to let a deceiver succeed in leading them astray. No matter how attractive the deception, they were to keep focused on a faithful walk with God according to His truth.

Today’s Verse of the Day:
Deuteronomy 13:4

It is the Lord your God you must follow, and him you must revere. Keep his commands and obey him; serve him and hold fast to him.
When we know we have heard from the Lord, we cannot let anyone convince us that He has changed His mind—regardless of the source of the supposed new revelation (Deut. 13:1–4; Gal. 1:8). Remember the warning of 2 Corinthians 11:14, 15, “
Satan himself masquerades as an angel of light. It is not surprising, then, if his servants also masquerade as servants of righteousness. Their end will be what their actions deserve.”

Today’s Lectionary Readings:
From the Psalter

Psalm 22:1-15
Why Have You Forsaken Me?


1 My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?
     Why are you so far from saving me,
     so far from my cries of anguish?
2 My God, I cry out by day, but you do not answer,
     by night, but I find no rest.

3 Yet you are enthroned as the Holy One;
     you are the one Israel praises.
4 In you our ancestors put their trust;
     they trusted and you delivered them.
5 To you they cried out and were saved;
     in you they trusted and were not put to shame.

6 But I am a worm and not a man,
     scorned by everyone, despised by the people.
7 All who see me mock me;
     they hurl insults, shaking their heads.
8 “He trusts in the Lord,” they say,
     “let the Lord rescue him.
  Let him deliver him,
     since he delights in him.”

9 Yet you brought me out of the womb;
     you made me trust in you, even at my mother’s breast.
10 From birth I was cast on you;
      from my mother’s womb you have been my God.

11 Do not be far from me,
      for trouble is near
      and there is no one to help.

12 Many bulls surround me;
      strong bulls of Bashan encircle me.
13 Roaring lions that tear their prey
      open their mouths wide against me.
14 I am poured out like water,
      and all my bones are out of joint.
   My heart has turned to wax;
      it has melted within me.
15 My mouth is dried up like a potsherd,
      and my tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth;
      you lay me in the dust of death.


Commentary
Verses 1-10: The Spirit of Christ, which was in the prophets, testifies in this psalm, clearly and fully, the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow. We have a sorrowful complaint of God's withdrawings. This may be applied to any child of God, pressed down, overwhelmed with grief and terror. Spiritual desertions are the saints' sorest afflictions; but even their complaint of these burdens is a sign of spiritual life, and spiritual senses exercised. To cry our, My God, why am I sick? why am I poor? savors of discontent and worldliness. But, "Why hast thou forsaken me?" is the language of a heart binding up its happiness in God's favor. This must be applied to Christ. In the first words of this complaint, he poured out his soul before God when he was upon the cross, Matthew 27:46. Being truly man, Christ felt a natural unwillingness to pass through such great sorrows, yet his zeal and love prevailed. Christ declared the holiness of God, his heavenly Father, in his sharpest sufferings; nay, declared them to be a proof of it, for which he would be continually praised by his Israel, more than for all other deliverances they received. Never any that hoped in thee, were made ashamed of their hope; never any that sought thee, sought thee in vain. Here is a complaint of the contempt and reproach of men. The Savior here spoke of the abject state to which he was reduced. The history of Christ's sufferings, and of his birth, explains this prophecy.

Verses 11-15: In these verses we have Christ suffering, and Christ praying; by which we are directed to look for crosses, and to look up to God under them. The very manner of Christ's death is described, though not in use among the Jews. They pierced his hands and his feet, which were nailed to the accursed tree, and his whole body was left so to hang as to suffer the most severe pain and torture. His natural force failed, being wasted by the fire of Divine wrath preying upon his spirits. Who then can stand before God's anger? or who knows the power of it? The life of the sinner was forfeited, and the life of the Sacrifice must be the ransom for it. Our Lord Jesus was stripped, when he was crucified, that he might clothe us with the robe of his righteousness. Thus it was written, therefore thus it behooved Christ to suffer. Let all this confirm our faith in him as the true Messiah, and excite our love to him as the best of friends, who loved us, and suffered all this for us. Christ in his agony prayed, prayed earnestly, prayed that the cup might pass from him. When we cannot rejoice in God as our song, yet let us stay ourselves upon him as our strength; and take the comfort of spiritual supports, when we cannot have spiritual delights. He prays to be delivered from the Divine wrath. He that has delivered, doth deliver, and will do so. We should think upon the sufferings and resurrection of Christ, till we feel in our souls the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings.


From the Books of Wisdom
Job 20:1-29
Zophar’s Second Speech


1 Then Zophar the Naamathite replied:

2 “My troubled thoughts prompt me to answer
     because I am greatly disturbed.
3 I hear a rebuke that dishonors me,
     and my understanding inspires me to reply.

4 “Surely you know how it has been from of old,
     ever since mankind was placed on the earth,
5 that the mirth of the wicked is brief,
     the joy of the godless lasts but a moment.
6 Though the pride of the godless person reaches to the heavens
     and his head touches the clouds,
7 he will perish forever, like his own dung;
     those who have seen him will say, ‘Where is he?’
8 Like a dream he flies away, no more to be found,
     banished like a vision of the night.
9 The eye that saw him will not see him again;
     his place will look on him no more.
10 His children must make amends to the poor;
      his own hands must give back his wealth.
11 The youthful vigor that fills his bones
      will lie with him in the dust.

12 “Though evil is sweet in his mouth
      and he hides it under his tongue,
13 though he cannot bear to let it go
      and lets it linger in his mouth,
14 yet his food will turn sour in his stomach;
      it will become the venom of serpents within him.
15 He will spit out the riches he swallowed;
      God will make his stomach vomit them up.
16 He will suck the poison of serpents;
      the fangs of an adder will kill him.
17 He will not enjoy the streams,
      the rivers flowing with honey and cream.
18 What he toiled for he must give back uneaten;
      he will not enjoy the profit from his trading.
19 For he has oppressed the poor and left them destitute;
      he has seized houses he did not build.

20 “Surely he will have no respite from his craving;
      he cannot save himself by his treasure.
21 Nothing is left for him to devour;
      his prosperity will not endure.
22 In the midst of his plenty, distress will overtake him;
      the full force of misery will come upon him.
23 When he has filled his belly,
      God will vent his burning anger against him
      and rain down his blows on him.
24 Though he flees from an iron weapon,
      a bronze-tipped arrow pierces him.
25 He pulls it out of his back,
      the gleaming point out of his liver.
   Terrors will come over him;
26    total darkness lies in wait for his treasures.
   A fire unfanned will consume him
      and devour what is left in his tent.
27 The heavens will expose his guilt;
      the earth will rise up against him.
28 A flood will carry off his house,
      rushing waters on the day of God’s wrath.
29 Such is the fate God allots the wicked,
      the heritage appointed for them by God.”


Commentary
Verses 1-9: Zophar's discourse is upon the certain misery of the wicked. The triumph of the wicked and the joy of the hypocrite are fleeting. The pleasures and gains of sin bring disease and pain; they end in remorse, anguish, and ruin. Dissembled piety is double iniquity, and the ruin that attends it will be accordingly.

Verses 10-22: The miserable condition of the wicked man in this world is fully set forth. The lusts of the flesh are here called the sins of his youth. His hiding it and keeping it under his tongue, denotes concealment of his beloved lust, and delight therein. But He who knows what is in the heart, knows what is under the tongue, and will discover it. The love of the world, and of the wealth of it, also is wickedness, and man sets his heart upon these. Also violence and injustice, these sins bring God's judgments upon nations and families. Observe the punishment of the wicked man for these things. Sin is turned into gall, than which nothing is more bitter; it will prove to him poison; so will all unlawful gains be. In his fullness he shall be in straits, through the anxieties of his own mind. To be led by the sanctifying grace of God to restore what was unjustly gotten, as Zaccheus was, is a great mercy. But to be forced to restore by the horrors of a despairing conscience, as Judas was, has no benefit and comfort attending it.

Verses 23-29: Zophar, having described the vexations which attend wicked practices, shows their ruin from God's wrath. There is no fence against this, but in Christ, who is the only Covert from the storm and tempest, Isaiah 32:2. Zophar concludes, "Such is the fate God allots the wicked, the heritage appointed for them by God." Never was any doctrine better explained, or worse applied, than this by Zophar, who intended to prove Job a hypocrite. Let us receive the good explanation, and make a better application, for warning to ourselves, to stand in awe and sin not. One view of Jesus, directed by the Holy Spirit, and by him suitably impressed upon our souls, will quell a thousand carnal reasonings about the suffering of the faithful.


From the Gospels
Matthew 15:1-9
Jesus Teaches True Commandments


15:1 Then some Pharisees and teachers of the law came to Jesus from Jerusalem and asked, 2 “Why do your disciples break the tradition of the elders? They don’t wash their hands before they eat!”

3 Jesus replied, “And why do you break the command of God for the sake of your tradition? 4 For God said, ‘Honor your father and mother’ and ‘Anyone who curses their father or mother is to be put to death.’ 5 But you say that if anyone declares that what might have been used to help their father or mother is ‘devoted to God,’ 6 they are not to ‘honor their father or mother’ with it. Thus you nullify the word of God for the sake of your tradition. 7 You hypocrites! Isaiah was right when he prophesied about you:

8 “‘These people honor me with their lips,
     but their hearts are far from me.
9 They worship me in vain;
     their teachings are merely human rules.’”


Commentary
Additions to God's laws reflect upon his wisdom, as if he had left out something which was needed, and which man could supply; in one way or other they always lead men to disobey God. How thankful ought we to be for the written word of God! Never let us think that the religion of the Bible can be improved by any human addition, either in doctrine or practice. Our blessed Lord spoke of their traditions as inventions of their own, and pointed out one instance in which this was very clear, that of their transgressing the fifth commandment. When a parent's wants called for assistance, they pleaded, that they had devoted to the temple all they could spare, even though they did not part with it, and therefore their parents must expect nothing from them. This was making the command of God of no effect. The doom of hypocrites is put in a little compass; "In vain do they worship me." It will neither please God, nor profit themselves; they trust in vanity, and vanity will be their recompense.


Today’s Lectionary Readings are selected from the Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, a three-year cyclical lectionary. We are currently in Year B. Beginning with the first Sunday of Advent in 2021, we will be in Year C. The year which ended at Advent 2020 was Year A. These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead; Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect and digest what they heard in worship. Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts. www.commontexts.org. The Bible texts of the Old Testament, Epistle, and Gospel lessons are from The Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide. Commentaries from Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible.

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