Friday, October 8, 2021

The Daily Bible Readings for Friday, October 8, 2021

 

The Daily Bible Readings
Friday, October 8, 2021
Psalm 22:1-15; Job 18:1-21; Hebrews 4:1-11
with commentaries from Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible

Introduction
In today’s lectionary readings, the Spirit of Christ, which was in the prophets, testifies in our psalm reading, clearly and fully, the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow. In our reading in Job, Bildad had before given Job good advice and encouragement; here, he used nothing but rebukes and declared his ruin. Many pastors and Bible scholars apply our readings in Hebrews along the lines of how believers can experience God’s peace or rest in the face of trials in our daily walk. In our verse of the day, none but God can do this, which is proof that Christ is God, since none but God can be a Savior.

Today’s Verse of the Day:
Isaiah 43:11-12

I, even I, am the Lord, and apart from me there is no savior. I have revealed and saved and proclaimed—I, and not some foreign god among you. You are my witnesses,” declares the Lord, “that I am God.
It is interesting that of all the religions of the world only Christianity guarantees salvation. Others put down quite a program, but they certainly do not guarantee salvation. God says, “Beside me there is no savior.”

Today’s Lectionary Readings:
From the Psalter

Psalm 22:1-15
Why Have You Forsaken Me?


1 My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?
     Why are you so far from saving me,
     so far from my cries of anguish?
2 My God, I cry out by day, but you do not answer,
     by night, but I find no rest.

3 Yet you are enthroned as the Holy One;
     you are the one Israel praises.
4 In you our ancestors put their trust;
     they trusted and you delivered them.
5 To you they cried out and were saved;
     in you they trusted and were not put to shame.

6 But I am a worm and not a man,
     scorned by everyone, despised by the people.
7 All who see me mock me;
     they hurl insults, shaking their heads.
8 “He trusts in the Lord,” they say,
     “let the Lord rescue him.
  Let him deliver him,
     since he delights in him.”

9 Yet you brought me out of the womb;
     you made me trust in you, even at my mother’s breast.
10 From birth I was cast on you;
      from my mother’s womb you have been my God.

11 Do not be far from me,
      for trouble is near
      and there is no one to help.

12 Many bulls surround me;
      strong bulls of Bashan encircle me.
13 Roaring lions that tear their prey
      open their mouths wide against me.
14 I am poured out like water,
      and all my bones are out of joint.
   My heart has turned to wax;
      it has melted within me.
15 My mouth is dried up like a potsherd,
      and my tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth;
      you lay me in the dust of death.


Commentary
Verses 1-10: The Spirit of Christ, which was in the prophets, testifies in this psalm, clearly and fully, the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow. We have a sorrowful complaint of God's withdrawings. This may be applied to any child of God, pressed down, overwhelmed with grief and terror. Spiritual desertions are the saints' sorest afflictions; but even their complaint of these burdens is a sign of spiritual life, and spiritual senses exercised. To cry our, My God, why am I sick? why am I poor? savors of discontent and worldliness. But, "Why hast thou forsaken me?" is the language of a heart binding up its happiness in God's favor. This must be applied to Christ. In the first words of this complaint, he poured out his soul before God when he was upon the cross, Matthew 27:46. Being truly man, Christ felt a natural unwillingness to pass through such great sorrows, yet his zeal and love prevailed. Christ declared the holiness of God, his heavenly Father, in his sharpest sufferings; nay, declared them to be a proof of it, for which he would be continually praised by his Israel, more than for all other deliverances they received. Never any that hoped in thee, were made ashamed of their hope; never any that sought thee, sought thee in vain. Here is a complaint of the contempt and reproach of men. The Savior here spoke of the abject state to which he was reduced. The history of Christ's sufferings, and of his birth, explains this prophecy.

Verses 11-15: In these verses we have Christ suffering, and Christ praying; by which we are directed to look for crosses, and to look up to God under them. The very manner of Christ's death is described, though not in use among the Jews. They pierced his hands and his feet, which were nailed to the accursed tree, and his whole body was left so to hang as to suffer the most severe pain and torture. His natural force failed, being wasted by the fire of Divine wrath preying upon his spirits. Who then can stand before God's anger? or who knows the power of it? The life of the sinner was forfeited, and the life of the Sacrifice must be the ransom for it. Our Lord Jesus was stripped, when he was crucified, that he might clothe us with the robe of his righteousness. Thus it was written, therefore thus it behooved Christ to suffer. Let all this confirm our faith in him as the true Messiah, and excite our love to him as the best of friends, who loved us, and suffered all this for us. Christ in his agony prayed, prayed earnestly, prayed that the cup might pass from him. When we cannot rejoice in God as our song, yet let us stay ourselves upon him as our strength; and take the comfort of spiritual supports, when we cannot have spiritual delights. He prays to be delivered from the Divine wrath. He that has delivered, doth deliver, and will do so. We should think upon the sufferings and resurrection of Christ, till we feel in our souls the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings.


From the Books of Wisdom
Job 18:1-21
Bildad’s Second Speech


1 Then Bildad the Shuhite replied:

2 “When will you end these speeches?
     Be sensible, and then we can talk.
3 Why are we regarded as cattle
     and considered stupid in your sight?
4 You who tear yourself to pieces in your anger,
     is the earth to be abandoned for your sake?
     Or must the rocks be moved from their place?

5 “The lamp of a wicked man is snuffed out;
     the flame of his fire stops burning.
6 The light in his tent becomes dark;
     the lamp beside him goes out.
7 The vigor of his step is weakened;
     his own schemes throw him down.
8 His feet thrust him into a net;
     he wanders into its mesh.
9 A trap seizes him by the heel;
     a snare holds him fast.
10 A noose is hidden for him on the ground;
      a trap lies in his path.
11 Terrors startle him on every side
      and dog his every step.
12 Calamity is hungry for him;
      disaster is ready for him when he falls.
13 It eats away parts of his skin;
      death’s firstborn devours his limbs.
14 He is torn from the security of his tent
      and marched off to the king of terrors.
15 Fire resides in his tent;
      burning sulfur is scattered over his dwelling.
16 His roots dry up below
      and his branches wither above.
17 The memory of him perishes from the earth;
      he has no name in the land.
18 He is driven from light into the realm of darkness
      and is banished from the world.
19 He has no offspring or descendants among his people,
      no survivor where once he lived.
20 People of the west are appalled at his fate;
      those of the east are seized with horror.
21 Surely such is the dwelling of an evil man;
      such is the place of one who does not know God.”


Commentary
Verses 1-4: Bildad had before given Job good advice and encouragement; here he used nothing but rebukes, and declared his ruin. And he concluded that Job shut out the providence of God from the management of human affairs, because he would not admit himself to be wicked.

Verses 5-10: Bildad describes the miserable condition of a wicked man; in which there is much certain truth, if we consider that a sinful condition is a sad condition, and that sin will be men's ruin, if they do not repent. Though Bildad thought the application of it to Job was easy, yet it was not safe nor just. It is common for angry disputants to rank their opponents among God's enemies, and to draw wrong conclusions from important truths. The destruction of the wicked is foretold. That destruction is represented under the similitude of a beast or bird caught in a snare, or a malefactor taken into custody. Satan, as he was a murderer, so he was a robber, from the beginning. He, the tempter, lays snares for sinners wherever they go. If he makes them sinful like himself, he will make them miserable like himself. Satan hunts for the precious life. In the transgression of an evil man there is a snare for himself, and God is preparing for his destruction. See here how the sinner runs himself into the snare.

Verses 11-21: Bildad describes the destruction wicked people are kept for, in the other world, and which in some degree, often seizes them in this world. The way of sin is the way of fear, and leads to everlasting confusion, of which the present terrors of an impure conscience are earnests, as in Cain and Judas. Miserable indeed is a wicked man's death, how secure soever his life was. See him dying; all that he trusts to for his support shall be taken from him. How happy are the saints, and how indebted to the lord Jesus, by whom death is so far done away and changed, that this king of terrors is become a friend and a servant! See the wicked man's family sunk and cut off. His children shall perish, either with him or after him. Those who consult the true honor of their family, and its welfare, will be afraid of withering all by sin. The judgments of God follow the wicked man after death in this world, as a proof of the misery his soul is in after death, and as an earnest of that everlasting shame and contempt to which he shall rise in the great day. The
name of the righteous is used in blessings, but the name of the wicked will rot, Proverbs 10:7. It would be well if this report of wicked men would cause any to flee from the wrath to come, from which their power, policy, and riches cannot deliver them. But Jesus ever lives to deliver all who trust in him. Bear up then, suffering believers. Ye shall for a little time have sorrow, but your Beloved, your Savior, will see you again; your hearts shall rejoice, and your joy no man takes away.

From the Epistles
Hebrews 4:1-11
The Rest that God Promised


4:1 Therefore, since the promise of entering his rest still stands, let us be careful that none of you be found to have fallen short of it. 2 For we also have had the good news proclaimed to us, just as they did; but the message they heard was of no value to them, because they did not share the faith of those who obeyed. 3 Now we who have believed enter that rest, just as God has said,

  “So I declared on oath in my anger,
     ‘They shall never enter my rest.’”

And yet his works have been finished since the creation of the world.
4 For somewhere he has spoken about the seventh day in these words: “On the seventh day God rested from all his works.” 5 And again in the passage above he says, “They shall never enter my rest.”

6 Therefore since it still remains for some to enter that rest, and since those who formerly had the good news proclaimed to them did not go in because of their disobedience, 7 God again set a certain day, calling it “Today.” This he did when a long time later he spoke through David, as in the passage already quoted:

  “Today, if you hear his voice,
     do not harden your hearts.”

8 For if Joshua had given them rest, God would not have spoken later about another day. 9 There remains, then, a Sabbath-rest for the people of God; 10 for anyone who enters God’s rest also rests from their works, just as God did from his. 11 Let us, therefore, make every effort to enter that rest, so that no one will perish by following their example of disobedience.

Commentary
The privileges we have under the gospel, are greater than any had under the law of Moses, though the same gospel for substance was preached under both Testaments. There have been in all ages many unprofitable hearers; and unbelief is at the root of all unfruitfulness under the word. Faith in the hearer is the life of the word. But it is a painful consequence of partial neglect, and of a loose and wavering profession, that they often cause men to seem to come short. Let us then give diligence, that we may have a clear entrance into the kingdom of God. As God finished his work, and then rested from it, so he will cause those who believe, to finish their work, and then to enjoy their rest. It is evident, that there is a more spiritual and excellent sabbath remaining for the people of God, than that of the seventh day, or that into which Joshua led the Jews. This rest is, a rest of grace, and comfort, and holiness, in the gospel state. And a rest in glory, where the people of God shall enjoy the end of their faith, and the object of all their desires. The rest, or sabbatism, which is the subject of the apostle's reasoning, and as to which he concludes that it remains to be enjoyed, is undoubtedly the heavenly rest, which remains to the people of God, and is opposed to a state of labor and trouble in this world. It is the rest they shall obtain when the Lord Jesus shall appear from heaven. But those who do not believe, shall never enter into this spiritual rest, either of grace here or glory hereafter. God has always declared man's rest to be in him, and his love to be the only real happiness of the soul; and faith in his promises, through his Son, to be the only way of entering that rest.


Today’s Lectionary Readings are selected from the Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, a three-year cyclical lectionary. We are currently in Year B. Beginning with the first Sunday of Advent in 2021, we will be in Year C. The year which ended at Advent 2020 was Year A. These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead; Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect and digest what they heard in worship. Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts. www.commontexts.org. The Bible texts of the Old Testament, Epistle, and Gospel lessons are from The Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide. Commentaries from Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible.

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