Friday, December 25, 2020

The Daily Readings for Friday, December 25, 2020 — Christmas Day — Nativity of Our Lord III

 

The Daily Readings
December 25, 2020 — Christmas Day — Nativity of Our Lord

The Word, the Light, the Glory of God
Isaiah 52:7-10; Psalm 98; Hebrews 1:1-4 [5-12]; John 1:1-14
The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV)


Opening Statement
In our readings today, Isaiah’s passage speaks to a people who have been confronted with a joy they once could not imagine:  God’s herald has called them out of exile, guided them home, and  challenged them to rebuild communities thought lost for good. How beautiful are the ones who bring this good news! The Hebrews passage identifies this herald as God’s own Child, who bears the very stamp of God’s nature. John chapter 1 identifies God’s Word as the One sent to be with us, leading with truth, but we must have eyes to recognize the Word.
Opening Prayer
We have waited for a long time for your hope, your joy, your love to shine in the darkness of this world, Almighty God. Even now, we await you. In our hearts, we still hope that your light will blaze forth, banishing the shadows of this world and guiding all the people back to you.

Yet you did not come into this world in a show of power and glory. You did not shine forth for all of creation to behold. A tiny spark—a newborn baby, visible to parents and curious animals. A host of angels—away from the populated areas, singing to migrant workers. A sparkling star—guiding foreigners to see what neighbors could not.

Open our hearts, merciful God, to the sparks of your presence still in this world. Open our eyes, that we might behold your presence in the least likely of places, and among the least likely of people.

God with us, kindle your spark within us, that together we may shine forth your light, we might banish the shadows of this world, we might be the continuation of the Christmas miracle: Emmanuel is in this world, God is with us, now and evermore.

Illumine our hearts, gracious God, that we might speak anew the words your Son will teach us...
Prayer of Confession
Gracious God,
we would like to be among those who saw the coming of the Christ Child, those who dropped all that they were doing and traveled to worship the coming of God's love into this world. We would like to be those who cared for God in infant vulnerability; who tickled and cuddled and comforted the growing child, that he might know love and safety.

And yet, merciful God,
we must recognize all the times we are more like Herod. Whenever we, in our actions or in our inactions, find our own need for control more compelling than the needs of others for health and safety. Whenever we cling to the security of our privilege, rather than standing up for the rights of the oppressed. Whenever we are complicit in the harming of innocents for the sake of profit, or power, or because we fear to know, and to change, the injustices of this world.

Loving God,
we confess our sins against you and one another, and pray that you will fill us with your light, that we may live our lives as true disciples in your name, without counting the cost. In the name of Christ, the one who showed us the way, we pray.  Amen.
Words of Assurance
God's light is present in this world. Present in the Christ child, born to lead us out of darkness. Present in the star, in all that guides us to love. God's light is in the world, and the darkness did not overcome it. God's grace is in the world, and our mis-steps will not overcome it. We are loved, we are forgiven. Alleluia!  Amen.
First Reading
Isaiah 52:7-10

Heralds announce God’s salvation
52:7 How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation; that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth!

8 Thy watchmen shall lift up the voice; with the voice together shall they sing: for they shall see eye to eye, when the Lord shall bring again Zion.

9 Break forth into joy, sing together, ye waste places of Jerusalem: for the Lord hath comforted his people, he hath redeemed Jerusalem.

10 The Lord hath made bare his holy arm in the eyes of all the nations; and all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God.
Commentary

The gospel proclaims liberty to those bound with fears. Let those weary and heavy laden under the burden of sin, find relief in Christ, shake themselves from the dust of their doubts and fears, and loose themselves from those bands. The price paid by the Redeemer for our salvation, was not silver or gold, or corruptible things, but his own precious blood. Considering the freeness of this salvation, and how hurtful to temporal comfort sins are, we shall more value the redemption which is in Christ. Do we seek victory over every sin, recollecting that the glory of God requires holiness in every follower of Christ? The good news is, that the Lord Jesus reigns. Christ himself brought these tidings first. His ministers proclaim these good tidings: keeping themselves clean from the pollutions of the world, they are beautiful to those to whom they are sent. Zion's watchmen could scarcely discern any thing of God's favour through the dark cloud of their afflictions; but now the cloud is scattered, they shall plainly see the performance. Zion's waste places shall then rejoice; all the world will have the benefit. This is applied to our salvation by Christ. Babylon is no place for Israelites. And it is a call to all in the bondage of sin and Satan, to use the liberty Christ has proclaimed. They were to go with diligent haste, not to lose time nor linger; but they were not to go with distrustful haste. Those in the way of duty, are under God's special protection; and he that believes this, will not hasten for fear.


Psalm 98
The victory of our God
1 O sing unto the Lord a new song; for he hath done marvellous things: his right hand, and his holy arm, hath gotten him the victory.

2 The Lord hath made known his salvation: his righteousness hath he openly shewed in the sight of the heathen.

3 He hath remembered his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel: all the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God.

4 Make a joyful noise unto the Lord, all the earth: make a loud noise, and rejoice, and sing praise.

5 Sing unto the Lord with the harp; with the harp, and the voice of a psalm.

6 With trumpets and sound of cornet make a joyful noise before the Lord, the King.

7 Let the sea roar, and the fulness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein.

8 Let the floods clap their hands: let the hills be joyful together

9 Before the Lord; for he cometh to judge the earth: with righteousness shall he judge the world, and the people with equity.
Commentary

A song of praise for redeeming love is a new song, a mystery hidden from ages and generations. Converts sing a new song, very different from what they had sung. If the grace of God put a new heart into our breasts, it will put a new song into our mouths. Let this new song be sung to the praise of God, in consideration of the wonders he has wrought. The Redeemer has overcome all difficulties in the way of our redemption, and was not discouraged by the services or sufferings appointed him. Let us praise him for the discoveries made to the world of the work of redemption; his salvation and his righteousness fulfilling the prophecies and promises of the Old Testament. In pursuance of this design, God raised up his Son Jesus to be not only a Light to lighten the Gentiles, but the glory of his people Israel. Surely it behoves us to inquire whether his holy arm hath gotten the victory in our hearts, over the power of Satan, unbelief, and sin? If this be our happy case, we shall exchange all light songs of vanity for songs of joy and thanksgiving; our lives will celebrate the Redeemer's praise.

Let all the children of men rejoice in the setting up the kingdom of Christ, for all may benefit by it. The different orders of rational creatures in the universe, seem to be described in figurative language in the reign of the great Messiah. The kingdom of Christ will be a blessing to the whole creation. We expect his second coming to begin his glorious reign. Then shall heaven and earth rejoice, and the joy of the redeemed shall be full. But sin and its dreadful effects will not be utterly done away, till the Lord come to judge the world in righteousness. Seeing then that we look for such things, let us give diligence that we may be found of him in peace, without spot, and blameless.


Second Reading
Hebrews 1:1-4 [5-12]

God has spoken by a son
1:1 God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets,

2 Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds;

3 Who being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high:

4 Being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.

[5 For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?

6 And again, when he bringeth in the firstbegotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him.

7 And of the angels he saith, Who maketh his angels spirits, and his ministers a flame of fire.

8 But unto the Son he saith, Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of thy kingdom.

9 Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows.

10 And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands:

11 They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment;

12 And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.]
Commentary

God spake to his ancient people at sundry times, through successive generations, and in divers manners, as he thought proper; sometimes by personal directions, sometimes by dreams, sometimes by visions, sometimes by Divine influences on the minds of the prophets. The gospel revelation is excellent above the former; in that it is a revelation which God has made by his Son. In beholding the power, wisdom, and goodness of the Lord Jesus Christ, we behold the power, wisdom, and goodness of the Father, John 14:7; the fulness of the Godhead dwells, not typically, or in a figure, but really, in him. When, on the fall of man, the world was breaking to pieces under the wrath and curse of God, the Son of God, undertaking the work of redemption, sustained it by his almighty power and goodness. From the glory of the person and office of Christ, we proceed to the glory of his grace. The glory of His person and nature, gave to his sufferings such merit as was a full satisfaction to the honour of God, who suffered an infinite injury and affront by the sins of men. We never can be thankful enough that God has in so many ways, and with such increasing clearness, spoken to us fallen sinners concerning salvation. That he should by himself cleanse us from our sins is a wonder of love beyond our utmost powers of admiration, gratitude, and praise.

Many Jews had a superstitious or idolatrous respect for angels, because they had received the law and other tidings of the Divine will by their ministry. They looked upon them as mediators between God and men, and some went so far as to pay them a kind of religious homage or worship. Thus it was necessary that the apostle should insist, not only on Christ's being the Creator of all things, and therefore of angels themselves, but as being the risen and exalted Messiah in human nature, to whom angels, authorities, and powers are made subject. To prove this, several passages are brought from the Old Testament. On comparing what God there says of the angels, with what he says to Christ, the inferiority of the angels to Christ plainly appears. Here is the office of the angels; they are God's ministers or servants, to do his pleasure. But, how much greater things are said of Christ by the Father! And let us own and honour him as God; for if he had not been God, he had never done the Mediator's work, and had never worn the Mediator's crown. It is declared how Christ was qualified for the office of Mediator, and how he was confirmed in it: he has the name Messiah from his being anointed. Only as Man he has his fellows, and as anointed with the Holy Spirit; but he is above all prophets, priests, and kings, that ever were employed in the service of God on earth. Another passage of Scripture, Psalm 102:25-27, is recited, in which the Almighty power of the Lord Jesus Christ is declared, both in creating the world and in changing it. Christ will fold up this world as a garment, not to be abused any longer, not to be used as it has been. As a sovereign, when his garments of state are folded and put away, is a sovereign still, so our Lord, when he has laid aside the earth and heavens like a vesture, shall be still the same. Let us not then set our hearts upon that which is not what we take it to be, and will not be what it now is. Sin has made a great change in the world for the worse, and Christ will make a great change in it for the better. Let the thoughts of this make us watchful, diligent, and desirous of that better world. The Saviour has done much to make all men his friends, yet he has enemies. But they shall be made his footstool, by humble submission, or by utter destruction. Christ shall go on conquering and to conquer. The most exalted angels are but ministering spirits, mere servants of Christ, to execute his commands. The saints, at present, are heirs, not yet come into possession. The angels minister to them in opposing the malice and power of evil spirits, in protecting and keeping their bodies, instructing and comforting their souls, under Christ and the Holy Ghost. Angels shall gather all the saints together at the last day, when all whose hearts and hopes are set upon perishing treasures and fading glories, will be driven from Christ's presence into everlasting misery.


The Gospel
John 1:1-14

The Word became flesh
 
1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

2 The same was in the beginning with God.

3 All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.

4 In him was life; and the life was the light of men.

5 And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.

6 There was a man sent from God, whose name was John.

7 The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through him might believe.

8 He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light.

9 That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.

10 He was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not.

11 He came unto his own, and his own received him not.

12 But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name:

13 Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.

14 And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.
Commentary

The plainest reason why the Son of God is called the Word, seems to be, that as our words explain our minds to others, so was the Son of God sent in order to reveal his Father's mind to the world. What the evangelist says of Christ proves that he is God. He asserts, His existence in the beginning; His coexistence with the Father. The Word was with God. All things were made by him, and not as an instrument. Without him was not any thing made that was made, from the highest angel to the meanest worm. This shows how well qualified he was for the work of our redemption and salvation. The light of reason, as well as the life of sense, is derived from him, and depends upon him. This eternal Word, this true Light shines, but the darkness comprehends it not. Let us pray without ceasing, that our eyes may be opened to behold this Light, that we may walk in it; and thus be made wise unto salvation, by faith in Jesus Christ.

John the Baptist came to bear witness concerning Jesus. Nothing more fully shows the darkness of men's minds, than that when the Light had appeared, there needed a witness to call attention to it. Christ was the true Light; that great Light which deserves to be called so. By his Spirit and grace he enlightens all that are enlightened to salvation; and those that are not enlightened by him, perish in darkness. Christ was in the world when he took our nature upon him, and dwelt among us. The Son of the Highest was here in this lower world. He was in the world, but not of it. He came to save a lost world, because it was a world of his own making. Yet the world knew him not. When he comes as a Judge, the world shall know him. Many say that they are Christ's own, yet do not receive him, because they will not part with their sins, nor have him to reign over them. All the children of God are born again. This new birth is through the word of God as the means, 1 Peter 1:23, and by the Spirit of God as the Author. By his Divine presence Christ always was in the world. But now that the fulness of time was come, he was, after another manner, God manifested in the flesh. But observe the beams of his Divine glory, which darted through this veil of flesh. Men discover their weaknesses to those most familiar with them, but it was not so with Christ; those most intimate with him saw most of his glory. Although he was in the form of a servant, as to outward circumstances, yet, in respect of graces, his form was like the Son of God His Divine glory appeared in the holiness of his doctrine, and in his miracles. He was full of grace, fully acceptable to his Father, therefore qualified to plead for us; and full of truth, fully aware of the things he was to reveal.


Here ends the Lessons

Click HERE to read today’s Holy Gospel Lesson message

The Nicene Creed

  • We believe in one God, the Father almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all things visible and invisible.
  • And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only Son of God, begotten from the Father before all ages, God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made; of the same essence as the Father. Through him all things were made. For us and for our salvation he came down from heaven; he became incarnate by the Holy Spirit and the virgin Mary, and was made human. He was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate; he suffered and was buried. The third day he rose again, according to the Scriptures. He ascended to heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father. He will come again with glory to judge the living and the dead. His kingdom will never end.
  • And we believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life. He proceeds from the Father and the Son, and with the Father and the Son is worshiped and glorified. He spoke through the prophets. We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic church. We affirm one baptism for the forgiveness of sins. We look forward to the resurrection of the dead, and to life in the world to come. Amen.
The Lord’s Prayer

Our Father who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us; And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil:

For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.
Holy Communion

A nondenominational serving of bread and wine
Many churches around the world are working hard to adapt to online worship, and one challenge is how our members can celebrate communion from home. Though no video can truly replace the experience of celebrating together in our places of worship, we know that where two or more are gathered, the Lord is present.
Sending
By the tender mercy of our God love has broken upon us! Light is given where once there was darkness and hope where there was only death. We go into this season knowing that God will guide our feet into the way of peace. Amen.
Mary Did You Know



Optional parts of the readings are set off in [square brackets.]

The Bible texts of the Old Testament, Epistle, and Gospel lessons are from The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV).

Commentaries from Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible.

The Daily Bible Readings are selected from the Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, a three-year cyclical lectionary. We are currently in Year B. Beginning with the first Sunday of Advent in 2021, we will be in Year C. The year which ended at Advent 2020 was Year A. These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead; Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect and digest what they heard in worship. Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts. www.commontexts.org
The Daily Readings for December 25, 2019 — Christmas Day — Nativity of Our Lord
Isaiah’s passage speaks to a people who have been confronted with a joy they once could not imagine:  God’s herald has called them out of exile, guided them home, and  challenged them to rebuild communities thought lost for good. How beautiful are the ones who bring this good news! The Hebrews passage identifies this herald as God’s own Child, who bears the very stamp of God’s nature. John chapter 1 identifies God’s Word as the One sent to be with us, leading with truth, but we must have eyes to recognize the Word.
The Word, the Light, the Glory of God
Isaiah 52:7-10; Psalm 98; Hebrews 1:1-4 [5-12]; John 1:1-14 (KJV)

“The Word and Light Incarnate” (John 1:1-14) The Sermon for Sunday, December 25, 2020

 

Today, our gospel message comes to us from John 1:1-14, “The Word became flesh.”
1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was in the beginning with God. 3 All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being 4 in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. 5 The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.

6 There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. 7 He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. 8 He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light. 9 The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world.

10 He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. 11 He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. 12 But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, 13 who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.

14 And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth (NRSV).
Heavenly Father, you sent your Son to reveal your will for our lives and redeem us from sin and death. Through the power of your Holy Spirit, inspire us with confidence that you are with us in the midst of the storms of life, bring peace to our troubled souls, and lead your church throughout the ages. Enable us to live as your redeemed saints, that our lives may witness to our faith. This we ask in Christ’s holy name. Amen.

“The Word and Light Incarnate”
By Chaplain Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson

For many folks, this time of year is very stressful because of their high expectations of themselves and others. On the lighter side, I came across ten things that help you know Christmas is almost here when: 1) The infamous fruitcake returns from its 12 months of hiding. 2) The NHL referees are not the only ones giving away games. 3) Santa’s belly is not the only thing shaking like a bowl of jelly. 4) Your Christmas list is written in black, while your checkbook balance is written in red. 5) You are pulling an all-nighter because of the words “Some assembly required.” 6) The Salvation Army bell ringers start accepting credit cards. 7) A trip to the mall and back is more challenging than the Indy 500. 8) It’s a Wonderful Life has been shown for the 13th time. 9) The credit card is smoked along with the turkey and ham. 10) There are more pine needles on your carpet than on your tree.

Hopefully, for you, Christmas is more than all of the things that add stress to your life. Both our passage from Hebrews and our gospel today speaks “the moreness” of Christmas. The Hebrews passage reminds us that the long ago and far away became the here-and-now closeness of God to humankind in the person of Jesus. The prophets who had visions of a Messiah spoke of the day he would come and longed for that day. For them, though he still seemed long ago and far away, even though they likely lived with the longing to see the Messiah in their lifetime. In the gospel, Jesus the Word existed in the long ago and far away creating the universe—then, one day, Jesus the Word became flesh and lived among us in the here-and-now. The gospel writer also refers to Jesus as “the light shining in the darkness.
Light that the darkness is not able to overcome or put out.

Mr. Anderson was in London, and of all the things he saw and did, the one that stood out most clearly was a visit to Nelson’s flagship, the Victory.

A young sailor, his face aglow with pride—showed him around, and when they reached a little cabin, he pointed to the very spot where Nelson died.

Suddenly the sailor switched off the lights, and had it not been for a solitary candle that flickered above them, they would have stood in darkness.

“You know, I’ll never forget it. When the lights went off, by that flickering flame I could almost see Trafalgar unfolding before my eyes.” It’s a bit like life, I thought later. For often, what is really worthwhile isn’t to be found in the spotlights, but rather in the places where a humble light burns perpetually. Jesus came in the flesh to live among us; born in a barn at a small place like Bethlehem; born to ordinary folks, yet he was the eternal Word that created all things and the Light of the world.

Jesus, a tiny, fragile, vulnerable baby in an insignificant corner of the world; yet, his humble beginning as a human being now has significance for the whole world and has drawn to himself millions upon millions of people down through the ages and right up to the present day. This small, humble beginning of Jesus’ birth reminds me of another story.

On Christmas Eve, 1937, an Australian radio announcer, Norman Banks, was sitting at the window of his Melbourne flat when he heard music from the open window opposite. There he saw an old woman with a lighted candle in her hand listening to a carol.

This fired his imagination, and on the following Christmas, he held his first open-air Carols by Candlelight service—a custom that has since spread all over Australia. The Melbourne service, which has been held each year since, has been broadcast around the world, millions have shared in it, and thousands have been raised for charity, all because of that old woman with her candle. It is amazing how one person lighting a candle in Australia could inspire millions around the globe to do the same. Jesus the light in the darkness, can and does overcome the darkness.

Speaking of Christmas Eve Candlelight services, back in 2008, when I was serving Grace Lutheran Church in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, our acolyte was extinguishing all of the candles at the end of the service. When she came to the Christ Candle on our Advent wreath, she made three unsuccessful attempts to extinguish it. Finally, on the fourth attempt, it was extinguished.

This reminded me of the Christmas Gospel: “The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.” Ultimately, Christ the Light of the world shall extinguish all darkness; we shall live in his Light eternally.

Speaking of living in Christ’s Light, our gospel continues to underscore the significant work of Christ the Light in verse nine: “The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world.” Sooner or later, he enlightens everyone. What does that mean? Well, I think there are endless ways in which he enlightens us. Of course, the obvious ways are through his word and the sacraments, through prayer, and the community of the faithful. He also enlightens us through our daily round, the challenges, and changes of life, the people we encounter at the bus stop, behind the grocery checkout stand, on a park bench. His enlightenment may reach us in the pages of history and literature; or through scientific and technological discoveries. Most of all, he enlightens us in and through those human beings: who are poor, who suffer, who are young and old, widows, widowers and orphans, refugees, those who often are at the boundaries of society. They are Jesus’ presence to us, and they enlighten us in that they are often the most kind and loving, generous, unselfish, and resilient people I’ve met. Jesus shines through them.

So, this Christmas, may the Light of Jesus the Messiah enlighten you and shine through you to share his love and grace with everyone. Amen.

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Scripture is taken from the New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright © 1989 the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Sermon contributed by Caplain Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson, Bethany Meadows Nursing Home of Camrose, AB on Dec 24, 2014.
Christmas sermon for December 25, 2020

The Daily Prayer for Friday, December 25, 2020

 

Prayer of the Day
Friday, December 25, 2020 — Christmas Day


For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government will be upon his shoulder, and his name will be called "Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace."
Isaiah 9:6 (RSV)

Lord our God, you have sent light to shine on earth and have revealed your heavenly power in Jesus Christ, so that in spite of all the darkness and evil we may rejoice because we have a Savior. Reveal your power in our day. Let something be done anew toward the building of your kingdom on earth. Let something draw men's hearts to you to give them light so that they may thank and praise you for all you have done and are still doing to bring the whole world into your hands. O Lord God, let men be moved by the opening of the heavens. May their hearts awaken and their sadness give way to joy in Jesus Christ the Savior. We are your children who are allowed to wait in expectation for you to set everything right. We can know that even in our troubled times your hand is at work to reveal your will, to make your will plain to all generations on earth, as you promised through Abraham. May your name be glorified, O Lord God. May your name be honored, your kingdom come, and your will be done on earth as in heaven. Amen.

Verse of the Day Friday, December 25, 2020

 

Isaiah 9:6
For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.
Jesus Christ came into the world to be our Prince of Peace—something that far exceeds what we experience on an earthly level. He also came to be our Wonderful Counselor through the Holy Spirit. And He came to reveal Himself as our Mighty God. He came to restore our relationship with Himself—our Eternal Father. Finally, He came to make us one with Himself.

Read all of Isaiah 9

Listen to Isaiah 9


The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV)