Sunday, November 29, 2020

The Daily Readings for Sunday, November 29, 2020 — First Sunday of Advent

 

The Daily Readings
Sunday, November 29, 2020 — First Sunday of Advent

Yearning for the Light
Isaiah 64:1-9; Psalm 80:1-7, 17-19; 1 Corinthians 1:3-9;
Mark 13:24-37
The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV)


Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.

Opening Sentences
We have just come from the Thanksgiving Celebrations and are now called to enter Advent with little preparation. We are not ready. We have not considered our spiritual dilemma. Left to our own devices we move easily and quickly from light into darkness. Isaiah’s call reminds us of the yearning of the people for God’s intervention in their darkness. Their plea is for God to rip open the heavens and come to save them. They feel incapable of escaping the darkness by themselves. Psalm 80 reminds us that God is a god of power and might and fully capable of saving God’s people. Their prayer is for salvation. Mark’s cryptic words raise images of darkness and the coming light. In Mark’s gospel, Jesus reminds us to be vigilant, for the true light is coming.

Advent begins with shadows of tension between hunger and hope. We hunger to know God’s presence in our lives, but we fear that by our thoughts and deeds we’ve blocked the coming of the good news in Christ. We know that God has reason enough to turn away. And yet, when we look closely, there are signs of hope. Christ is coming, but we won’t know exactly when. We must be ready!
Opening Prayer
Almighty God, as we begin this season of Advent remind us again that in the midst of our darkness you are bringing us peace, to calm our anxious spirits and hectic lives. Turn our hearts again toward you. Make us ready to receive your Son our Savior. Slow our pace, and give us the blessing of feeling your peace in our spirits. For we ask this in Jesus’ precious Name. Amen.
Prayer of Confession
It’s starting already, Lord. It is only the first Sunday in Advent, and we are caught up in the pressures and stresses of the holiday season. Pursued by the temptation to spend our funds, our energy, our spirits, we feel that there is no peace or rest in the world. Lord of light and peace, shine on us this day. Forgive us when we have so easily succumbed to the anxieties and fears and temptations of the season. Slow us down. Calm our spirits. Give us an awareness that this is the season of waiting and of preparation. Pour peace into our lives and help us to be bearers of peace to others. For we ask this in Jesus’ precious Name. Amen.
Assurance of Pardon
Even in the midst of difficult times, God is with us, bringing peace to us. Receive God’s rich blessing of peace and hope. Amen.
First Reading
Isaiah 64:1-9

God will come with power and compassion
64:1 Oh that thou wouldest rend the heavens, that thou wouldest come down, that the mountains might flow down at thy presence,

2 As when the melting fire burneth, the fire causeth the waters to boil, to make thy name known to thine adversaries, that the nations may tremble at thy presence!

3 When thou didst terrible things which we looked not for, thou camest down, the mountains flowed down at thy presence.

4 For since the beginning of the world men have not heard, nor perceived by the ear, neither hath the eye seen, O God, beside thee, what he hath prepared for him that waiteth for him.

5 Thou meetest him that rejoiceth and worketh righteousness, those that remember thee in thy ways: behold, thou art wroth; for we have sinned: in those is continuance, and we shall be saved.

6 But we are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags; and we all do fade as a leaf; and our iniquities, like the wind, have taken us away.

7 And there is none that calleth upon thy name, that stirreth up himself to take hold of thee: for thou hast hid thy face from us, and hast consumed us, because of our iniquities.

8 But now, O Lord, thou art our father; we are the clay, and thou our potter; and we all are the work of thy hand.

9 Be not wroth very sore, O Lord, neither remember iniquity for ever: behold, see, we beseech thee, we are all thy people.
Commentary

They desire that God would manifest himself to them and for them, so that all may see it. This is applicable to the second coming of Christ, when the Lord himself shall descend from heaven. They plead what God had used to do, and had declared his gracious purpose to do, for his people. They need not fear being disappointed of it, for it is sure; or disappointed in it, for it is sufficient. The happiness of his people is bound up in what God has designed for them, and is preparing for them, and preparing them for; what he has done or will do. Can we believe this, and then think any thing too great to expect from his truth, power, and love? It is spiritual and cannot be comprehended by human understanding. It is ever ready. See what communion there is between a gracious God and a gracious soul. We must make conscience of doing our duty in every thing the Lord our God requires. Thou meetest him; this speaks his freeness and forwardness in doing them good. Though God has been angry with us for our sins, and justly, yet his anger has soon ended; but in his favour is life, which goes on and continues, and on that we depend for our salvation.

The people of God, in affliction, confess and bewail their sins, owning themselves unworthy of his mercy. Sin is that abominable thing which the Lord hates. Our deeds, whatever they may seem to be, if we think to merit by them at God's hand, are as rags, and will not cover us; filthy rags, and will but defile us. Even our few good works in which there is real excellence, as fruits of the Spirit, are so defective and defiled as done by us, that they need to be washed in the fountain open for sin and uncleanness. It bodes ill when prayer is kept back. To pray, is by faith to take hold of the promises the Lord has made of his good-will to us, and to plead them; to take hold of him, earnestly begging him not to leave us; or soliciting his return. They brought their troubles upon themselves by their own folly. Sinners are blasted, and then carried away, by the wind of their own iniquity; it withers and then ruins them. When they made themselves as an unclean thing, no wonder that God loathed them. Foolish and careless as we are, poor and despised, yet still Thou art our Father. It is the wrath of a Father we are under, who will be reconciled; and the relief our case requires is expected only from him. They refer themselves to God. They do not say, “Lord, rebuke us not,” for that may be necessary; but, “Not in thy displeasure.” They state their lamentable condition. See what ruin sin brings upon a people; and an outward profession of holiness will be no defence against it. God's people presume not to tell him what he shall say, but their prayer is, Speak for the comfort and relief of thy people. How few call upon the Lord with their whole hearts, or stir themselves to lay hold upon him! God may delay for a time to answer our prayers, but he will, in the end, answer those who call on his name and hope in his mercy.

Psalm 80:1-7, 17-19
We shall be saved
1 Give ear, O Shepherd of Israel, thou that leadest Joseph like a flock; thou that dwellest between the cherubims, shine forth.

2 Before Ephraim and Benjamin and Manasseh stir up thy strength, and come and save us.

3 Turn us again, O God, and cause thy face to shine; and we shall be saved.

4 O Lord God of hosts, how long wilt thou be angry against the prayer of thy people?

5 Thou feedest them with the bread of tears; and givest them tears to drink in great measure.

6 Thou makest us a strife unto our neighbours: and our enemies laugh among themselves.

7 Turn us again, O God of hosts, and cause thy face to shine; and we shall be saved.

17 Let thy hand be upon the man of thy right hand, upon the son of man whom thou madest strong for thyself.

18 So will not we go back from thee: quicken us, and we will call upon thy name.

19 Turn us again, O Lord God of hosts, cause thy face to shine; and we shall be saved.
Commentary

He that dwelleth upon the mercy-seat, is the good Shepherd of his people. But we can neither expect the comfort of his love, nor the protection of his arm, unless we partake of his converting grace. If he is really angry at the prayers of his people, it is because, although they pray, their ends are not right, or there is some secret sin indulged in them, or he will try their patience and perseverance in prayer. When God is displeased with his people, we must expect to see them in tears, and their enemies in triumph. There is no salvation but from God's favour; there is no conversion to God but by his own grace.

The Messiah, the Protector and Saviour of the church, is the Man of God's right hand; he is the Arm of the Lord, for all power is given to him. In him is our strength, by which we are enabled to persevere to the end. The vine, therefore, cannot be ruined, nor can any fruitful branch perish; but the unfruitful will be cut off and cast into the fire. The end of our redemption is, that we should serve Him who hath redeemed us, and not go back to our old sins.


Second Reading
1 Corinthians 1:3-9

Gifts of grace sustain us
1:3 Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.

4 I thank my God always on your behalf, for the grace of God which is given you by Jesus Christ;

5 That in every thing ye are enriched by him, in all utterance, and in all knowledge;

6 Even as the testimony of Christ was confirmed in you:

7 So that ye come behind in no gift; waiting for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ:

8 Who shall also confirm you unto the end, that ye may be blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ.

9 God is faithful, by whom ye were called unto the fellowship of his Son Jesus Christ our Lord.
Commentary

All Christians are by baptism dedicated and devoted to Christ, and are under strict obligations to be holy. But in the true church of God are all who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, and who call upon him as God manifest in the flesh, for all the blessings of salvation; who acknowledge and obey him as their Lord, and as Lord of all; it includes no other persons. Christians are distinguished from the profane and atheists, that they dare not live without prayer; and they are distinguished from Jews and pagans, that they call on the name of Christ. Observe how often in these verses the apostle repeats the words, Our Lord Jesus Christ. He feared not to make too frequent or too honourable mention of him. To all who called upon Christ, the apostle gave his usual salutation, desiring, in their behalf, the pardoning mercy, sanctifying grace, and comforting peace of God, through Jesus Christ. Sinners can have no peace with God, nor any from him, but through Christ. He gives thanks for their conversion to the faith of Christ; that grace was given them by Jesus Christ. They had been enriched by him with all spiritual gifts. He speaks of utterance and knowledge. And where God has given these two gifts, he has given great power for usefulness. These were gifts of the Holy Ghost, by which God bore witness to the apostles. Those that wait for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, will be kept by him to the end; and those that are so, will be blameless in the day of Christ, made so by rich and free grace. How glorious are the hopes of such a privilege; to be kept by the power of Christ, from the power of our corruptions and Satan's temptations!


The Gospel
Mark 13:24-37

The coming of the Son of Man
13:24 But in those days, after that tribulation, the sun shall be darkened, and the moon shall not give her light,

25 And the stars of heaven shall fall, and the powers that are in heaven shall be shaken.

26 And then shall they see the Son of man coming in the clouds with great power and glory.

27 And then shall he send his angels, and shall gather together his elect from the four winds, from the uttermost part of the earth to the uttermost part of heaven.

28 Now learn a parable of the fig tree; When her branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaves, ye know that summer is near:

29 So ye in like manner, when ye shall see these things come to pass, know that it is nigh, even at the doors.

30 Verily I say unto you, that this generation shall not pass, till all these things be done.

31 Heaven and earth shall pass away: but my words shall not pass away.

32 But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father.

33 Take ye heed, watch and pray: for ye know not when the time is.

34 For the Son of Man is as a man taking a far journey, who left his house, and gave authority to his servants, and to every man his work, and commanded the porter to watch.

35 Watch ye therefore: for ye know not when the master of the house cometh, at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning:

36 Lest coming suddenly he find you sleeping.

37 And what I say unto you I say unto all, Watch.
Commentary

The disciples had confounded the destruction of Jerusalem and the end of the world. This mistake Christ set right, and showed that the day of Christ's coming, and the day of judgment, shall be after that tribulation. Here he foretells the final dissolution of the present frame and fabric of the world. Also, the visible appearance of the Lord Jesus coming in the clouds, and the gathering together of all the elect to him.

We have the application of this prophetic sermon. As to the destruction of Jerusalem, expect it to come very shortly. As to the end of the world, do not inquire when it will come, for of that day and that hour knoweth no man. Christ, as God, could not be ignorant of anything; but the Divine wisdom which dwelt in our Saviour, communicated itself to his human soul according to the Divine pleasure. As to both, our duty is to watch and pray. Our Lord Jesus, when he ascended on high, left something for all his servants to do. We ought to be always upon our watch, in expectation of his return. This applies to Christ's coming to us at our death, as well as to the general judgment. We know not whether our Master will come in the days of youth, or middle age, or old age; but, as soon as we are born, we begin to die, and therefore we must expect death. Our great care must be, that, whenever our Lord comes, he may not find us secure, indulging in ease and sloth, mindless of our work and duty. He says to all, Watch, that you may be found in peace, without spot, and blameless.


Here end the Readings

The Apostles’ Creed

  • I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth.
  • I believe in Jesus Christ, his only son, our Lord, who was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried; he descended to hell. On the third day he rose again; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of the Father, and he will come again to judge the living and the dead.
  • I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

The Lord’s Prayer

Our Father who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us; And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil:

For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.
Sending
Be alert! God is all around us! Be ready to joyfully serve God in ministries of peace and justice through Jesus Christ our Lord. Go in peace and may the peace of God always go with you. Amen.


The Bible texts of the Old Testament, Epistle, and Gospel lessons are from The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV).

Commentaries from Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible.

The Daily Bible Readings are selected from the Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, a three-year cyclical lectionary. We are currently in Year B. Beginning with the first Sunday of Advent in 2021, we will be in Year C. The year which ended at Advent 2020 was Year A. These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead; Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect and digest what they heard in worship. Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts. www.commontexts.org
First Sunday of Advent
We have just come from the Thanksgiving Celebrations and are now called to enter Advent with little preparation. We are not ready. We have not considered our spiritual dilemma. Left to our own devices we move easily and quickly from light into darkness. Isaiah’s call reminds us of the yearning of the people for God’s intervention in their darkness. Their plea is for God to rip open the heavens and come to save them. They feel incapable of escaping the darkness by themselves. Psalm 80 reminds us that God is a god of power and might and fully capable of saving God’s people. Their prayer is for salvation. Mark’s cryptic words raise images of darkness and the coming light. In Mark’s gospel, Jesus reminds us to be vigilant, for the true light is coming.

Advent begins with shadows of tension between hunger and hope. We hunger to know God’s presence in our lives, but we fear that by our thoughts and deeds we’ve blocked the coming of the good news in Christ. We know that God has reason enough to turn away. And yet, when we look closely, there are signs of hope. Christ is coming, but we won’t know exactly when. We must be ready!
Isaiah 64:1-9; Psalm 80:1-7, 17-19; 1 Corinthians 1:3-9; Mark 13:24-37
The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV)

Prayer of the Day for Sunday, November 29, 2020

 

Prayer of the Day
Sunday, November 29, 2020


Very truly I tell you, whoever believes in me will do the works I have been doing, and they will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father.
John 14:12 (NIV)

Lord our God, we call to you, "Abba, dear Father!" because your Spirit draws us to Jesus Christ the Savior and to his gospel. We call to you for we belong to your kingdom. Give us strength to remain steadfast through all the troubles of our lives. Let your hand remain over us and over the warring nations. Your hand directs, your hand carries out the thoughts of your heart. May the time soon come when you will bring everything to fulfillment and give peace on earth. In expectation we praise your name, for you will bring this time and you will bring it soon. For your kingdom must come, your will must be done on earth as in heaven, and everything must go according to your plan. Amen.

Verse of the Day Sunday, November 29, 2020

 

Verse of the Day
Sunday, November 29, 2020


Psalm 136:1
O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever.
Forgetful as we are, things must be often repeated to us. By “mercy” we understand the Lord's disposition to save those whom sin has rendered miserable and vile, and all the provision he has made for the redemption of sinners by Jesus Christ. The counsels of this mercy have been from everlasting, and the effects of it will endure for ever, to all who are interested in it. The Lord continues equally ready to show mercy to all who seek for it, and this is the source of all our hope and comfort.

Read all of Psalm 136

Listen to Psalm 136


Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV)

Ichthus Ministries Daily Devotions — ACCOMPLISHED AMONG US

 

ACCOMPLISHED AMONG US

Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the things that have been accomplished among us, just as those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word have delivered them to us, it seemed good to me also, having followed all things closely for some time past, to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus, that you may have certainty concerning the things you have been taught.

I'm writing this during the pandemic, and I am as prickly as a porcupine. We are under orders to stay home—and so there are three people and a dog sharing the same small space. The air is filled with whining (not all of it from the dog). We are cranky and snarly with one another—in a pastor's household! Where is God in this mess?

Maybe Luke was thinking something like that when he wrote his introduction for Theophilus. Luke says that he is writing a narrative "of the things that have been accomplished among us." He doesn't say "what we did" or even "how God used us." He puts the whole thing in the passive.

Who is doing the accomplishing? Clearly it's God. What are we doing, then? Mostly getting in the way, I suspect. And what is getting accomplished anyway, in spite of us? The coming of God into our world. The birth of God as a human baby, Jesus Christ. The beginning of God's saving acts, as He rescues us from our broken, sin-stained, deathly situation. This Advent, let's watch what God is doing in the midst of us.

Lord, thank You for loving and saving me, in spite of me. Amen.

Reflection Questions:
* How does your mood affect the way you relate to God?

* Why do you think God chose to save us completely on His own, without our help?

* Does that comfort you? Why or why not?
Lenten Devotions were written by Dr. Kari Vo. Use these devotions in your newsletter and bulletin! Used by permission; all rights reserved by the Int'l LLL (LHM).
I'm writing this during the pandemic, and I am as prickly as a porcupine. We are under orders to stay home—and so there are three people and a dog sharing the same small space. The air is filled with whining (not all of it from the dog). We are cranky and snarly with one another—in a pastor's household! Where is God in this mess?

Standing Strong Through the Storm — EVANGELISM FUNCTION OF THE CHURCH

 
EVANGELISM FUNCTION OF THE CHURCH

“Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit…”

Johan Companjen, President Emeritus of Open Doors International, was traveling in the Philippines. Finding it extremely hot in his hotel room, he called for a staff person. “Is the air-conditioning not working?” he asked. “Oh yes sir,” the man replied, “It’s working. It’s just not functioning!”

Jesus Christ ordained five functions for His church to be involved in for Him. We are to evangelize (Matthew 28:19); to disciple or train those who are evangelized (Matthew 28:20); to minister or serve people demonstrating God’s love (Matthew 22:39; Ephesians 4:12); to fellowship together (Ephesians 2:19; Galatians 6:10); and to worship together (Matthew 4:10; John 4:23). In the Bible, there is not necessarily a priority order for these five purposes. They are all equally important.

Evangelism is one primary function. If we really have come to know Christ as Lord and Savior, we will want to share this wonderful experience with those we love. It sometimes seems hard or embarrassing to share the Gospel with our friends and relatives. But if we really love them, and if we really believe that without Christ they will suffer for eternity separated from God, we will tell them no matter how oppressive the culture or the political situation may be.

Restrictions on the church cause new creative means of evangelism to arise. In a restricted country of Asia, one such creative method is to hire a bus and invite relatives and friends to a free outing to the beach. Once in the bus, the pastor with a hand-held loudspeaker starts preaching to his “captive audience” about the love of Christ. At the beach, the sharing and fellowship continues…as well as a water baptism for new believers.

In Soviet Russia, a group of Christians took advantage of the funeral of a small daughter of one of the members to present a public evangelistic witness. On the way to the cemetery, they stopped every few hundred meters to sing triumphant songs of praise. The father of the dead child also gave a clear message of salvation in Christ. Many listeners along the way were deeply touched.

In Vietnam, Pastor Ho Hieu Ha spent over six years in prison for pastoring a growing church right under the noses of the unhappy authorities. But he felt that his imprisonment was not a waste because he used the time to witness to others who were also in prison. When he was released, he had led ninety-six people to Jesus and discipled them.

RESPONSE: I am committed to sharing Christ’s love with others. It is a primary function of the church.

PRAYER: Pray for those in restricted environments as they creatively find ways to witness about their faith.


Standing Strong Through The Storm (SSTS), a daily devotional message by SSTS author Paul Estabrooks. © 2011 Open Doors International. Used by permission.
“It’s working. It’s just not functioning!”

John Piper Devotional — The Only Conscience-Cleanser

 
The Only Conscience-Cleanser

How much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our conscience from dead works to serve the living God.

So here we are in the modern age—the age of the Internet, smartphones, space travel, and heart transplants—and our problem is fundamentally the same as always: our consciences condemn us and make us feel unacceptable to God. We are alienated from God.

We can cut ourselves, or throw our children in the sacred river, or give a million dollars to charity, or serve in a soup kitchen, or a hundred forms of penance and self-injury, and the result will be the same: the stain remains and death terrifies.

We know that our conscience is defiled—not with external things like touching a corpse, a dirty diaper, or a piece of pork. Jesus said it is what comes out of a man that defiles, not what goes in (Mark 7:15-23). We are defiled by attitudes like pride and self-pity and bitterness and lust and envy and jealousy and covetousness and apathy and fear.

The only answer in this modern age, as in every other age, is the blood of Christ. When your conscience rises up and condemns you, where will you turn? Hebrews 9:14 gives you the answer: turn to Christ.

Turn to the blood of Christ. Turn to the only cleansing agent in the universe that can give you relief in life and peace in death.

So here we are in the modern age—the age of the Internet, smartphones, space travel, and heart transplants—and our problem is fundamentally the same as always: our consciences condemn us and make us feel unacceptable to God. We are alienated from God.

Un dia a la Vez — Oración por compromisos

 
Oración por compromisos

Ten compasión de mí, oh Dios; ten compasión de mí, que en ti confío. A la sombra de tus alas me refugiaré.

Señor, mi Dios, buscamos tu rostro en este día dándote gracias por tus maravillas.

Gracias, Jesús, porque tú eres mayor que cualquier necesidad y que cualquier problema que pueda tener.

Ayúdame, Señor, a ser una persona de palabra, que mi «sí» sea sí y mi «no» sea no. No permitas, mi Dios, que vaya por el mundo creando falsas expectativas. Por eso, quita de mí toda soberbia y hazme una persona recta.

Te honro hoy y me comprometo a hacer cambios y a buscar tu rostro cada día.

Quiero ser un mejor compañero de trabajo, un buen líder, un excelente padre, el mejor de los cónyuges y el mejor de los hijos.

Además, Señor, anhelo amarte, servirte y entregarme a ti con todo mi corazón.

Pongo delante de ti este nuevo día y confío en tus promesas.

Bendice a mi familia y guárdanos de todo mal y peligro.

En el nombre de Jesús, amén y amén.


Un Día a la Vez Copyright © by Claudia Pinzón
Oración por compromisos: Señor, mi Dios, buscamos tu rostro en este día dándote gracias por tus maravillas…

Devocional CPTLN — Se han cumplido entre nosotros

 

Se han cumplido entre nosotros

Excelentísimo Teófilo: Muchos han tratado ya de relatar en forma ordenada la historia de los sucesos que ciertamente se han cumplido entre nosotros, tal y como nos los enseñaron quienes desde el principio fueron testigos presenciales y ministros de la palabra. Después de haber investigado todo con sumo cuidado desde su origen, me ha parecido una buena idea escribírtelas por orden, para que llegues a conocer bien la verdad de lo que se te ha enseñado.

Escribo esto durante la pandemia, y estoy tan erizada como un puercoespín. Tenemos órdenes de quedarnos en casa, por lo que somos tres personas y un perro que compartimos el mismo pequeño espacio. El aire está lleno de quejas (no solo del perro). Estamos de mal humor y nos gruñimos unos a otros, ¡en la casa de un pastor! ¿Dónde está Dios en este lío?

Quizás Lucas estaba pensando en algo así cuando escribió su introducción para Teófilo. Lucas dice que está escribiendo una narración "de los sucesos... que se han cumplido entre nosotros". Él no dice "lo que nosotros hicimos", ni tampoco "cómo Dios nos usó". Lo pone todo usando los verbos en forma pasiva.

¿Quién había cumplido todas estas cosas? Claramente es Dios. ¿Qué hacemos nosotros, entonces? Sospecho que, más que nada, nos interponemos en el camino. ¿Y qué se logra de todos modos, a pesar de nosotros? La venida de Dios a nuestro mundo. El nacimiento de Dios como ser humano en la persona de Jesucristo. El comienzo de los actos salvíficos de Dios, ya que él nos rescata de nuestra situación de quebranto, muerte y contaminación pecaminosa. Este Adviento, veamos lo que Dios está haciendo en medio de nosotros.

ORACIÓN: Señor, gracias por amarme y salvarme, a pesar de mí. Amén.

Dra. Kari Vo

Para reflexionar:
* ¿Cómo afecta a tu estado de ánimo tu relación con el Señor?

* ¿Por qué crees que Dios eligió salvarnos solo por su cuenta, sin nuestra ayuda?

* ¿Te consuela eso? ¿Por qué sí o por qué no?
© Copyright 2020 Cristo Para Todas Las Naciones. Que a través de estos devocionales, la Palabra de Dios te refresque en tu diario caminar.
Escribo esto durante la pandemia, y estoy tan erizada como un puercoespín. Tenemos órdenes de quedarnos en casa, por lo que somos tres personas y un perro que compartimos el mismo pequeño espacio. El aire está lleno de quejas (no solo del perro). Estamos de mal humor y nos gruñimos unos a otros, ¡en la casa de un pastor! ¿Dónde está Dios en este lío?

Unser Täglich Brot — Süße Sache

 

Süße Sache

Lesung: Jesaja 25,1-9 | Die Bibel in einem Jahr: Hesekiel 35-36; 2. Petrus 1

In Jerusalem wird der Herr, der Allmächtige, ein großes Fest für alle Völker ausrichten.

Russische Hochzeitsbräuche sind reich an Bedeutung und Symbolik. Einer dieser Bräuche findet während des Hochzeitsempfangs statt. Der Moderator spricht einen Toast auf das Brautpaar aus und alle trinken einen Schluck, erheben die Gläser und rufen: „Gorko! Gorko!“ („Bitter“). Bei jedem „Gorko“-Ruf müssen die Brautleute aufstehen und sich küssen, um das Getränk wieder süß zu machen.

Jesaja prophezeit, dass der bittere Trank von Vernichtung, Zerstörung und Fluch über der Erde (Kap. 24) vergehen und der süßen Hoffnung auf einen neuen Himmel und eine neue Erde Platz machen wird (Kap. 25). Gott wird ein großes Fest mit köstlichem Essen und leckerem Wein ausrichten. Ein riesiges Bankett voll Segen, Genuss und Überfluss für alle Völker (V. 6). Ja, mehr noch. Unter der Herrschaft des gerechten Königs wird der Tod beseitigt, bittere Tränen werden abgewischt und die Wolke der Schmach weggenommen (V. 7-8). Sein Volk wird sich freuen, weil der Eine, auf den sie trauen und gewartet haben, Rettung bringt und den bitteren Kelch wieder süß macht (V. 9).

Eines Tages werden wir zusammen mit Jesus bei der Hochzeit des Lammes sitzen. Wenn er seine Braut (die Gemeinde) willkommen heißt, werden die Verheißungen aus Jesaja 25 erfüllt. Das einst so bittere Leben wird wieder süß.
Wo sehnst du dich danach, dass Gott das Bittere wieder süß macht? Was kannst du tun, um anderen Menschen das Leben zu versüßen?
Herr, ich erlebe um mich herum oft so viel Schmerz und Not, Leid und Tod. Manchmal ist es schwer zu glauben, dass du das Bittere wieder süß machen willst. Hilf mir, meine Hoffnung auf dich zu setzen, den Einen, der versprochen hat, uns die Trauerkleider auszuziehen und Schönheit und Freude zu schenken.

Von Marvin Williams

© 2020 Unser Täglich Brot
Russische Hochzeitsbräuche sind reich an Bedeutung und Symbolik. Einer dieser Bräuche findet während des Hochzeitsempfangs statt.