Tuesday, November 17, 2020

The Daily Bible Readings for TUESDAY, November 17, 2020

 

The Daily Readings
TUESDAY, November 17, 2020
Psalm 83:1-4, 9-10, 17-18; Exodus 2:1-10; 1 Thessalonians 5:12-18
The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV)

Today’s Verse-of-the-Day:
Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.
Left to ourselves, we often don’t know which path leads to life and which way ends in death; we remain in the dark. But through His Word, God sheds light on our situation and leads us to safety.

Today’s Readings:
Psalm 83:1-4, 9-10, 17-18
Do not be silent O God

1 Keep not thou silence, O God: hold not thy peace, and be not still, O God.

2 For, lo, thine enemies make a tumult: and they that hate thee have lifted up the head.

3 They have taken crafty counsel against thy people, and consulted against thy hidden ones.

4 They have said, Come, and let us cut them off from being a nation; that the name of Israel may be no more in remembrance.

9 Do unto them as unto the Midianites; as to Sisera, as to Jabin, at the brook of Kison:

10 Which perished at Endor: they became as dung for the earth.

17 Let them be confounded and troubled for ever; yea, let them be put to shame, and perish:

18 That men may know that thou, whose name alone is Jehovah, art the most high over all the earth.
Commentary

Verses 1-8 — Sometimes God seems not to be concerned at the unjust treatment of his people. But then we may call upon him, as the psalmist here. All wicked people are God's enemies, especially wicked persecutors. The Lord's people are his hidden one; the world knows them not. He takes them under his special protection. Do the enemies of the church act with one consent to destroy it, and shall not the friends of the church be united? Wicked men wish that there might be no religion among mankind. They would gladly see all its restraints shaken off, and all that preach, profess, or practise it, cut off. This they would bring to pass if it were in their power. The enemies of God's church have always been many: this magnifies the power of the Lord in preserving to himself a church in the world.

Verses 9-18 — All who oppose the kingdom of Christ may here read their doom. God is the same still that ever he was; the same to his people, and the same against his and their enemies. God would make their enemies like a wheel; unsettled in all their counsels and resolves. Not only let them be driven away as stubble, but burnt as stubble. And this will be the end of wicked men. Let them be made to fear thy name, and perhaps that will bring them to seek thy name. We should desire no confusion to our enemies and persecutors but what may forward their conversion. The stormy tempest of Divine vengeance will overtake them, unless they repent and seek the pardoning mercy of their offended Lord. God's triumphs over his enemies, clearly prove that he is, according to his name JEHOVAH, an almighty Being, who has all power and perfection in himself. May we fear his wrath, and yield ourselves to be his willing servants. And let us seek deliverance by the destruction of our fleshly lusts, which war against the soul.


Exodus 2:1-10
Mother and sister protect Moses

2:1 And there went a man of the house of Levi, and took to wife a daughter of Levi.

2 And the woman conceived, and bare a son: and when she saw him that he was a goodly child, she hid him three months.

3 And when she could not longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and with pitch, and put the child therein; and she laid it in the flags by the river's brink.

4 And his sister stood afar off, to wit what would be done to him.

5 And the daughter of Pharaoh came down to wash herself at the river; and her maidens walked along by the river's side; and when she saw the ark among the flags, she sent her maid to fetch it.

6 And when she had opened it, she saw the child: and, behold, the babe wept. And she had compassion on him, and said, This is one of the Hebrews' children.

7 Then said his sister to Pharaoh's daughter, Shall I go and call to thee a nurse of the Hebrew women, that she may nurse the child for thee?

8 And Pharaoh's daughter said to her, Go. And the maid went and called the child's mother.

9 And Pharaoh's daughter said unto her, Take this child away, and nurse it for me, and I will give thee thy wages. And the women took the child, and nursed it.

10 And the child grew, and she brought him unto Pharaoh's daughter, and he became her son. And she called his name Moses: and she said, Because I drew him out of the water.
Commentary

Verses 1-4 — Observe the order of Providence: just at the time when Pharaoh's cruelty rose to its height by ordering the Hebrew children to be drowned, the deliverer was born. When men are contriving the ruin of the church, God is preparing for its salvation. The parents of Moses saw he was a goodly child. A lively faith can take encouragement from the least hint of the Divine favour. It is said, Hebrews 11:23, that the parents of Moses hid him by faith; they had the promise that Israel should be preserved, which they relied upon. Faith in God's promise quickens to the use of lawful means for obtaining mercy. Duty is ours, events are God's. Faith in God will set us above the fear of man. At three months' end, when they could not hide the infant any longer, they put him in an ark of bulrushes by the river's brink, and set his sister to watch. And if the weak affection of a mother were thus careful, what shall we think of Him, whose love, whose compassion is, as himself, boundless. Moses never had a stronger protection about him, no, not when all the Israelites were round his tent in the wilderness, than now, when he lay alone, a helpless babe upon the waves. No water, no Egyptian can hurt him. When we seem most neglected and forlorn, God is most present with us.

Verses 5-10 — Come, see the place where that great man, Moses, lay, when he was a little child; it was in a bulrush basket by the river's side. Had he been left there long, he must have perished. But Providence brings Pharaoh's daughter to the place where this poor forlorn infant lay, and inclines her heart to pity it, which she dares do, when none else durst. God's care of us in our infancy ought to be often mentioned by us to his praise. Pharaoh cruelly sought to destroy Israel, but his own daughter had pity on a Hebrew child, and not only so, but, without knowing it, preserved Israel's deliverer, and provided Moses with a good nurse, even his own mother. That he should have a Hebrew nurse, the sister of Moses brought the mother into the place of a nurse. Moses was treated as the son of Pharaoh's daughter. Many who, by their birth, are obscure and poor, by surprising events of Providence, are raised high in the world, to make men know that God rules.


1 Thessalonians 5:12-18
The Christian life

5:12 And we beseech you, brethren, to know them which labour among you, and are over you in the Lord, and admonish you;

13 And to esteem them very highly in love for their work's sake. And be at peace among yourselves.

14 Now we exhort you, brethren, warn them that are unruly, comfort the feebleminded, support the weak, be patient toward all men.

15 See that none render evil for evil unto any man; but ever follow that which is good, both among yourselves, and to all men.

16 Rejoice evermore.

17 Pray without ceasing.

18 In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you.
Commentary

Verses 12-15 — The ministers of the gospel are described by the work of their office, which is to serve and honour the Lord. It is their duty not only to give good counsel, but also to warn the flock of dangers, and reprove for whatever may be amiss. The people should honour and love their ministers, because their business is the welfare of men's souls. And the people should be at peace among themselves, doing all they can to guard against any differences. But love of peace must not make us wink at sin. The fearful and sorrowful spirits, should be encouraged, and a kind word may do much good. We must bear and forbear. We must be long-suffering, and keep down anger, and this to all men. Whatever man do to us, we must do good to others.

Verses 16-18 — We are to rejoice in creature-comforts, as if we rejoiced not, and must not expect to live many years, and rejoice in them all; but if we do rejoice in God, we may do that evermore. A truly religious life is a life of constant joy. And we should rejoice more, if we prayed more. Prayer will help forward all lawful business, and every good work. If we pray without ceasing, we shall not want matter for thanksgiving in every thing. We shall see cause to give thanks for sparing and preventing, for common and uncommon, past and present, temporal and spiritual mercies. Not only for prosperous and pleasing, but also for afflicting providences, for chastisements and corrections; for God designs all for our good, though we at present see not how they tend to it.



The Bible texts of the Old Testament, Epistle, and Gospel lessons are from The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV).

Commentaries from Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible.

The Daily Bible Readings are selected from the Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, a three-year cyclical lectionary. We are currently in Year A. Beginning with the first Sunday of Advent in 2020, we will be in Year B. The year which ended at Advent 2019 was Year C. These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead; Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect and digest what they heard in worship. Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts. www.commontexts.org
The Daily Readings for TUESDAY, November 17, 2020
Psalm 83:1-4, 9-10, 17-18; Exodus 2:1-10; 1 Thessalonians 5:12-18 (KJV)

Prayer of the Day for TUESDAY, November 17, 2020

 

Prayer of the Day
TUESDAY, November 17, 2020


What answer shall be given to the envoys of that nation? "The Lord has established Zion, and in her his afflicted people will find refuge."
Isaiah 14:32 (NIV)

Lord our God, you are our refuge. We wait for you, for your purpose will never fail and your promise will be fulfilled. This we may firmly believe, and from this we may draw strength every day. Even when our life brings sorrow, we do not want to grieve. We want to hope and believe and endure until your day comes. Your kingdom will come on earth, and in the meantime you are watching over your people. In the midst of the world's daily affairs there will be people who hope in you, who belong to you, and who are firmly rooted in the grace of Jesus Christ until the time is fulfilled. Amen.

Verse of the Day for TUESDAY, November 17, 2020

 

Verse of the Day
TUESDAY, November 17, 2020


Psalm 119:105
Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.
Left to ourselves, we often don’t know which path leads to life and which way ends in death; we remain in the dark. But through His Word, God sheds light on our situation and leads us to safety.

Read all of Psalm 119

Listen to Psalm 119


The Holy Bible, King James Version (KJV)

Ichthus Ministries Daily Devotions — After Disaster

 

After Disaster

"For thus says the Lord GOD: Behold, I, I Myself will search for My sheep and will seek them out. As a shepherd seeks out his flock when he is among his sheep that have been scattered, so will I seek out My sheep, and I will rescue them from all places where they have been scattered on a day of clouds and thick darkness. And I will bring them out from the peoples and gather them from the countries, and will bring them into their own land. And I will feed them on the mountains of Israel, by the ravines, and in all the inhabited places of the country. I will feed them with good pasture, and on the mountain heights of Israel shall be their grazing land. There they shall lie down in good grazing land, and on rich pasture they shall feed on the mountains of Israel. I Myself will be the Shepherd of My sheep, and I Myself will make them lie down, declares the Lord GOD. I will seek the lost, and I will bring back the strayed, and I will bind up the injured, and I will strengthen the weak, and the fat and the strong I will destroy. I will feed them in justice."

Have you ever walked into a disaster and had to deal with it?

If you have, you know the mindset that settles down on you. You haven't got time to panic or cry or be afraid. Someone's got to deal, and that someone is you. So your eyes flick around the scene: Who's bleeding, who's broken, who's making a lot of noise but can probably wait. You look for immediate threats, like fire or oncoming cars. You look to see what resources you've got: there a person who could call 9-1-1; here a sweater we could use for bandages, there a safe spot of pavement where we can park the survivors. You start shouting orders: "You, there, get that kid out of the street! You, over there, call the cops!" You swing into action, and just keep doing the next thing, and the next, and the next ... until it's all over, and you can go home and pass out. (And have nightmares ...)

Ezekiel shows us God dealing with disaster. His people have been attacked and scattered, helpless sheep in the face of evil. And God says: "I Myself will search for My sheep and will seek them out. ... I will rescue them from all places where they have been scattered on a day of clouds and thick darkness. ... I will bring them out from the peoples and gather them from the countries ... I will seek the lost, and I will bring back the strayed, and I will bind up the injured, and I will strengthen the weak, and the fat and the strong I will destroy."

How did God do that? How does He deal with the ongoing disaster that is our world today—full of violence, hate, plague, war, and lawlessness? How does He deal with our personal disasters—our grief, shame, fear, worry, and loneliness? He deals through Jesus Christ, our Shepherd.

Look at what the Lord says: "I, I Myself will search for My sheep." God Himself came into our world in search of us. During the years of His ministry, He taught the truth, healed the sick, raised the dead, and gave the Good News of salvation to the poor. And He capped this by actually laying down His life for His sheep, when He was arrested and crucified. Through His death He set us free from the power of evil, and through His resurrection from the dead He brought us life that will last forever. Our disaster has become a blessing.

Dear Lord, thank You for being my Shepherd, and keep me close to You. Amen.

Dr. Kari Vo

Reflection Questions:
1. Think of a small disaster in your own life. Who helped you?

2. What did that person do? Why?

3. How do you see Jesus Christ reflected in the loving care of that person?

Use these devotions in your newsletter and bulletin! Used by permission; all rights reserved by the Int'l LLL (LHM).
Have you ever walked into a disaster and had to deal with it?

Standing Strong Through the Storm — RELEASE FROM CHAINS

 
RELEASE FROM CHAINS

Suddenly there was such a violent earthquake that the foundations of the prison were shaken. At once all the prison doors flew open, and everyone’s chains came loose.

African Muslim, El Gasim, saw the sign of the cross one day while praying the usual five times a day in the prison where he was incarcerated. He changed positions, but the cross wouldn’t go away. This went on for seven days. He had no explanation for it, except that Christ was calling him to give his life to Him. A Christian pastor, also in prison, explained that living for Christ would not be without suffering. They prayed together.

Other Muslim inmates saw El Gasim praying one day with another Christian prisoner and reported them to the authorities. When summoned to the superintendent’s office, they openly declared their faith in Christ and received twenty-five lashes each, administered by a Christian warder. The other prisoner denied his new faith, but El Gasim confessed Christ and said he would face the consequence, no matter what. This enraged the authorities. He was beaten, shackled in chains weighing over fifty pounds, and put on death row to be hanged.

The imprisoned pastor had great compassion for El Gasim, knowing that if God did not intervene, he was surely staring death in the eye. He told him Paul and Silas’ story, reminding him that he wasn’t the first to be beaten and chained for the sake of Christ. The important thing to remember was that Paul and Silas prayed and praised God when their chains fell off, and the prison doors opened. The pastor confirmed that it could still happen today because the power that worked then was still at work today. They prayed together, earnestly seeking God’s will.

The pastor retired to his room and continued praying. In the meantime, El Gasim, who then felt encouraged by the sharing, took the first step, and to his surprise, the unexpected happened—the chain broke loose and fell from one of his legs. Bystanders, whose attention was drawn by the sound of the falling chain, watched in amazement as he took the second step—the same thing happened. A miracle had happened right before him and his other inmates. El Gasim went to the warder and told him, “Your chains are in the chapel. Go and collect them.”

Trembling and confused, the warder informed his superiors of this strange occurrence. An emergency meeting was convened. The incident could not be ignored or laughed off as nonsense. There were too many witnesses. They decided that it would be best to let El Gasim go free because if he stayed, he would certainly convert others to Christianity. Sending him to another prison wouldn’t help either, because even there, they couldn’t stop Christ from doing miracles.

RESPONSE: Today, I affirm my faith in a miracle-working God who can release me from my chains.

PRAYER: Pray for persecuted Christian prisoners who need to be released from chains today.


Standing Strong Through The Storm (SSTS), a daily devotional message by SSTS author Paul Estabrooks. © 2011 Open Doors International. Used by permission.
African Muslim, El Gasim, saw the sign of the cross one day while praying the usual five times a day in the prison where he was incarcerated. He changed positions, but the cross wouldn’t go away.

John Piper Devotional — Change Is Possible

 
Change Is Possible

Put on the new self, created after the likeness of God in true righteousness and holiness.

Christianity means change is possible. Deep, fundamental change. It is possible to become tenderhearted when once you were callous and insensitive. It is possible to stop being dominated by bitterness and anger. It is possible to become a loving person no matter what your background has been.

The Bible assumes that God is the decisive factor in making us what we should be. With wonderful bluntness, the Bible says, “Put away malice and be tender-hearted.” It does not say, “If you can…” Or: “If your parents were tender-hearted to you…” Or: “If you weren’t terribly wronged…” It says, “Be tender-hearted.”

This is wonderfully freeing. It frees us from the terrible fatalism that says change is impossible for me. It frees me from mechanistic views that make my background my destiny.

And God’s commands always come with freeing, life-changing truth to believe. For example,

  1. God adopted us as his children. We have a new Father and a new family. This breaks the fatalistic forces of our “family-of-origin.” “Do not call anyone on earth your father; for one is your Father, He who is in heaven” (Matthew 23:9).
  2. God loves us as his children. We are “loved children.” The command to imitate the love of God does not hang in the air. It comes with power: “Be imitators of God as loved children.” “Love!” is the command, and being loved is the power.
  3. God has forgiven us in Christ. Be tender-hearted and forgiving just as God in Christ forgave you. What God did is power to change. The command to be tender-hearted has more to do with what God did for you than what your mother did to you. This kind of command means you can change.
  4. Christ loved you and gave himself up for you. “Walk in love just as Christ loved you.” The command comes with life-changing truth. “Christ loved you.” At the moment when there is a chance to love, and some voice says, “You are not a loving person,” you can say, “Christ’s love for me makes me a new kind of person. His command to love is just as surely possible for me as his promise of love is true for me.
Christianity means change is possible. Deep, fundamental change.

Un dia a la Vez — Cuando Dios produce los cambios

 
Cuando Dios produce los cambios

Escucha, hijo mío; acoge mis palabras, y los años de tu vida aumentarán. Yo te guío por el camino de la sabiduría, te dirijo por sendas de rectitud.

Como hijo de Dios, no te debes preocupar, ni tienes que dudar, ni temer. ¿Por qué? Porque es muy diferente cuando las situaciones de la vida se presentan con el sello de Dios. Es como cuando compras un auto de lujo y sabes que no te dará ni un dolor de cabeza. O cuando compras confiado un aparato electrodoméstico de una marca reconocida porque sabes que tendrás en casa lo que cuesta en calidad y en garantía. Mejor aun, es cuando tu Padre celestial te llama a un cambio.

A cada momento, Dios nos muestra esferas de la vida que están podridas. Sí, eso es, suena feo y horrible, pero es verdad. Nos están contaminando y serían capaces de infectar a las personas que nos rodean.

He visto también que cuando Dios tiene un llamado, prepara nuestros corazones para cambios en la vida. Quizá sea dejar un trabajo secular para servirle al cien por cien en la obra. Esto atemoriza porque queremos sentirnos seguros. Entonces, cuando no vemos nada fijo, podemos dudar. Sin embargo, debes saber que los cambios son necesarios y determinantes para nuestro futuro.

Cuando dejamos todo en las manos de Dios, no hay problema, pues Él no se equivoca. Sabe lo que es mejor para cada uno de sus hijos y ve las cosas de otra manera, pues conoce el futuro. Así que no te resistas cuando sientas un llamado al cambio. Dios tiene el control y no hay nada más maravilloso que servirle a Él que es el mejor jefe.


Un Día a la Vez Copyright © by Claudia Pinzón
Como hijo de Dios, no te debes preocupar, ni tienes que dudar, ni temer. ¿Por qué?

Devocional CPTLN — Después del desastre

 

Después del desastre

Sí, así ha dicho Dios el Señor: «Yo mismo voy a ir en busca de mis ovejas, y yo mismo las cuidaré, tal y como las cuida el pastor cuando se halla entre sus ovejas esparcidas. Yo las rescataré de todos los lugares por los que fueron esparcidas aquel día nublado y oscuro. Las sacaré de los pueblos y países donde ahora están, y las traeré a su propia tierra; las apacentaré en los montes y en las riberas de Israel, y en todos los lugares habitados del país. Las apacentaré en los mejores pastos, y pondré su aprisco en los altos montes de Israel; allí dormirán en un buen redil, y serán apacentadas en los pastos suculentos de los montes de Israel. Yo les daré a mis ovejas buenos pastos y apriscos seguros. Buscaré a las ovejas perdidas, y devolveré al redil a las que perdieron el camino; les vendaré las patas a las ovejas lastimadas, y fortaleceré a las ovejas débiles. Seré justo con mis ovejas, pero eliminaré a las ovejas engordadas y rechonchas.»
¿Alguna vez has tenido que lidiar con un desastre?

Si es así, sabes que cuando te enfrentas con un desastre, no hay tiempo para entrar en pánico, llorar o tener miedo. Alguien tiene que lidiar con él, y ese alguien eres tú. Primero tus ojos recorren la escena para ver quién está sangrando, lastimado, o simplemente magullado. Luego, te fijas para ver si alguna amenaza inmediata, como un incendio o automóviles que se aproximan. Después haces un inventario de los recursos a mano: alguien que pueda buscar ayuda, con qué auxiliar a quienes están lastimados, etc. Y finalmente entras en acción haciendo todo lo que puedes, hasta que todo termina y puedes irte a tu casa a desplomarte en un sillón.

En el texto para hoy, Ezequiel nos muestra a Dios lidiando con un desastre. Su pueblo ha sido atacado y esparcido como ovejas indefensas ante el mal. Y Dios dice: "Yo mismo voy a ir en busca de mis ovejas, y yo mismo las cuidaré... Yo las rescataré de todos los lugares por los que fueron esparcidas aquel día nublado y oscuro... Las sacaré de los pueblos y países donde ahora están... Buscaré a las ovejas perdidas, y devolveré al redil a las que perdieron el camino; les vendaré las patas a las ovejas lastimadas, y fortaleceré a las ovejas débiles. Seré justo con mis ovejas, pero eliminaré a las ovejas engordadas y rechonchas".

¿Cómo hizo Dios eso? ¿Cómo lidia Dios con el desastre que es nuestro mundo hoy, lleno de violencia, odio, plagas, guerras y anarquía? ¿Cómo lidia con nuestros desastres personales: nuestro dolor, vergüenza, miedo, preocupación y soledad? A través de Jesucristo, nuestro Pastor.

Mira lo que dice el Señor: "Yo mismo voy a ir en busca de mis ovejas". Dios mismo vino a nuestro mundo en busca de nosotros. Durante su ministerio enseñó la verdad, sanó a los enfermos, resucitó a los muertos y dio las buenas nuevas de salvación a los pobres. Y finalmente puso fin a todo esto dando su vida por sus ovejas. A través de su muerte nos liberó del poder del mal, y mediante su resurrección de entre los muertos nos trajo una vida que durará para siempre. Nuestro desastre se ha convertido en una bendición.

ORACIÓN: Amado Señor, gracias por ser mi Pastor y mantenerme cerca de Ti. Amén.

Dra. Kari Vo

Para reflexionar:
1. Si alguna vez has sufrido un desastre, ¿quién te ayudó? ¿De qué forma y por qué lo hizo?

2. ¿Puedes ver a Jesucristo reflejado en el cuidado amoroso de esa persona?
© Copyright 2020 Cristo Para Todas Las Naciones. Que a través de estos devocionales, la Palabra de Dios te refresque en tu diario caminar.
¿Alguna vez has tenido que lidiar con un desastre?

Nuestro Pan Diario — Si tan solo pudiéramos…

 

Si tan solo pudiéramos…

La escritura de hoy: Salmo 28
La Biblia en un año: La Biblia en un año: Ezequiel 5–7; Hebreos 12

El Señor es la fortaleza de su pueblo…

El cedro se agitaba de un lado al otro en los fuertes vientos de la tormenta. A Regina le encantaba ese árbol, el cual no solo había provisto refugio del sol del verano, sino también privacidad para la familia. Ahora, la violenta tempestad estaba arrancándolo de raíz. Rápidamente, Regina corrió a intentar rescatar el árbol, acompañada por su hijo de quince años. Pero por más que trataron, no les alcanzó la fuerza.

Dios fue la fortaleza del rey David cuando él clamó al Señor en medio de otra clase de tormenta (Salmo 28:8). Algunos comentaristas dicen que escribió esto en un tiempo en el que su mundo se derrumbaba. Su propio hijo estaba rebelándose contra él en un intento de usurparle el trono (2 Samuel 15). David se sentía tan vulnerable y débil que temía que Dios guardara silencio y lo dejara morir (Salmo 28:1). «Oye la voz de mis ruegos cuando clamo a ti», le dijo a Dios (v. 2). El Señor le dio la fuerza para seguir adelante, aunque la relación con su hijo nunca se restauró.

¡Cuánto anhelamos evitar que sucedan cosas malas! Si tan solo pudiéramos hacerlo. Pero en nuestra debilidad, Dios promete que siempre podemos clamar a Él como nuestra Roca (vv. 1-2). Cuando no tenemos fuerza, Él es nuestro Pastor y nos sustentará para siempre (vv. 8-9).


De:  Anne Cetas

Reflexiona y ora
Señor, ayúdame a recordar que, sin ti, nada puedo hacer.
¿Alguna vez te sentiste vulnerable e incapaz de solucionar una situación? ¿Cómo viste a Dios obrar en medio de eso?
© 2020 Ministerios Nuestro Pan Diario
El cedro se agitaba de un lado al otro en los fuertes vientos de la tormenta. A Regina le encantaba ese árbol, el cual no solo había provisto refugio del sol del verano, sino también privacidad para la familia. Ahora, la violenta tempestad estaba arrancándolo de raíz.