Monday, February 25, 2019

The Daily Lectionary for MONDAY, February 25, 2019

Head Coverings
1 Corinthians 11:2-16

The Daily Lectionary
MONDAY, February 25, 2019
(Revised Common Lectionary Year C)

Psalm 38
A Penitent Sufferer’s Plea for Healing
A Psalm of David, for the memorial offering.
1  O Lord, do not rebuke me in your anger,
     or discipline me in your wrath.
2  For your arrows have sunk into me,
     and your hand has come down on me.

3  There is no soundness in my flesh
     because of your indignation;
   there is no health in my bones
     because of my sin.
4  For my iniquities have gone over my head;
     they weigh like a burden too heavy for me.

5  My wounds grow foul and fester
     because of my foolishness;
6  I am utterly bowed down and prostrate;
     all day long I go around mourning.
7  For my loins are filled with burning,
     and there is no soundness in my flesh.
8  I am utterly spent and crushed;
     I groan because of the tumult of my heart.

9  O Lord, all my longing is known to you;
     my sighing is not hidden from you.
10 My heart throbs, my strength fails me;
     as for the light of my eyes—it also has gone from me.
11 My friends and companions stand aloof from my affliction,
     and my neighbors stand far off.

12 Those who seek my life lay their snares;
     those who seek to hurt me speak of ruin,
     and meditate treachery all day long.

13 But I am like the deaf, I do not hear;
     like the mute, who cannot speak.
14 Truly, I am like one who does not hear,
     and in whose mouth is no retort.

15 But it is for you, O Lord, that I wait;
     it is you, O Lord my God, who will answer.
16 For I pray, “Only do not let them rejoice over me,
     those who boast against me when my foot slips.”

17 For I am ready to fall,
     and my pain is ever with me.
18 I confess my iniquity;
     I am sorry for my sin.
19 hose who are my foes without cause are mighty,
     and many are those who hate me wrongfully.
20 Those who render me evil for good
     are my adversaries because I follow after good.

21 Do not forsake me, O Lord;
     O my God, do not be far from me;
22 make haste to help me,
     O Lord, my salvation.

Genesis 33:1-17
Jacob and Esau Meet
33:1 Now Jacob looked up and saw Esau coming, and four hundred men with him. So he divided the children among Leah and Rachel and the two maids. 2 He put the maids with their children in front, then Leah with her children, and Rachel and Joseph last of all. 3 He himself went on ahead of them, bowing himself to the ground seven times, until he came near his brother.

4 But Esau ran to meet him, and embraced him, and fell on his neck and kissed him, and they wept. 5 When Esau looked up and saw the women and children, he said, “Who are these with you?” Jacob said, “The children whom God has graciously given your servant.” 6 Then the maids drew near, they and their children, and bowed down; 7 Leah likewise and her children drew near and bowed down; and finally Joseph and Rachel drew near, and they bowed down. 8 Esau said, “What do you mean by all this company that I met?” Jacob answered, “To find favor with my lord.” 9 But Esau said, “I have enough, my brother; keep what you have for yourself.” 10 Jacob said, “No, please; if I find favor with you, then accept my present from my hand; for truly to see your face is like seeing the face of God—since you have received me with such favor. 11 Please accept my gift that is brought to you, because God has dealt graciously with me, and because I have everything I want.” So he urged him, and he took it.

12 Then Esau said, “Let us journey on our way, and I will go alongside you.” 13 But Jacob said to him, “My lord knows that the children are frail and that the flocks and herds, which are nursing, are a care to me; and if they are overdriven for one day, all the flocks will die. 14 Let my lord pass on ahead of his servant, and I will lead on slowly, according to the pace of the cattle that are before me and according to the pace of the children, until I come to my lord in Seir.”

15 So Esau said, “Let me leave with you some of the people who are with me.” But he said, “Why should my lord be so kind to me?” 16 So Esau returned that day on his way to Seir. 17 But Jacob journeyed to Succoth, and built himself a house, and made booths for his cattle; therefore the place is called Succoth.

1 Corinthians 11:2-16
Head Coverings
11:2 I commend you because you remember me in everything and maintain the traditions just as I handed them on to you. 3 But I want you to understand that Christ is the head of every man, and the husband is the head of his wife, and God is the head of Christ. 4 Any man who prays or prophesies with something on his head disgraces his head, 5 but any woman who prays or prophesies with her head unveiled disgraces her head—it is one and the same thing as having her head shaved. 6 For if a woman will not veil herself, then she should cut off her hair; but if it is disgraceful for a woman to have her hair cut off or to be shaved, she should wear a veil. 7 For a man ought not to have his head veiled, since he is the image and reflection of God; but woman is the reflection of man. 8 Indeed, man was not made from woman, but woman from man. 9 Neither was man created for the sake of woman, but woman for the sake of man. 10 For this reason a woman ought to have a symbol of authority on her head, because of the angels. 11 Nevertheless, in the Lord woman is not independent of man or man independent of woman. 12 For just as woman came from man, so man comes through woman; but all things come from God. 13 Judge for yourselves: is it proper for a woman to pray to God with her head unveiled? 14 Does not nature itself teach you that if a man wears long hair, it is degrading to him, 15 but if a woman has long hair, it is her glory? For her hair is given to her for a covering. 16 But if anyone is disposed to be contentious—we have no such custom, nor do the churches of God.

Optional parts of the readings are set off in square brackets.

The Bible texts of the Old Testament, Epistle and Gospel lessons are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright 1989 by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Church of Christ in the USA, and used by permission.

The Daily Lectionary is a three year cyclical lectionary. We are currently in Year C. Beginning with the first Sunday of Advent in 2019, we will be in Year A. The year which ended at Advent 2018 was Year B. These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead; Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect and digest on what they heard in worship. Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts. www.commontexts.org
Any man who prays or prophesies with something on his head disgraces his head, but any woman who prays or prophesies with her head unveiled disgraces her head—it is one and the same thing as having her head shaved.

Verse of the Day for MONDAY, February 25, 2019


Matthew 22:37-39 (NIV) Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’

Read all of Matthew 22

Listen to Matthew 22

Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

Un dia a la Vez - No estás en derrota


No estás en derrota

Levántate [...] Ya brotan flores en los campos; ¡el tiempo de la canción ha llegado!

Darnos por vencidos en la vida es cerrarles las puertas al cambio. Un divorcio, una enfermedad, una pérdida, un despido repentino de un trabajo, un hijo que se va de casa, tener un familiar en la cárcel o, más aun, en las drogas… ¡Qué terrible!

Sé que muchos de los que hoy leemos este libro hemos pasado al menos por una de estas penosas situaciones. Y sabes que la misma frustración de lo que estamos viviendo no nos permite ver, mucho menos creer, que después de la tormenta viene la calma.

En ocasiones dudamos que hasta Dios, que es el dueño de nuestra vida, pueda estar interesado en tal problema y que nos dé en algún momento la salida o una solución.

Sin embargo, necesitamos conocer a Dios en medio de estas crisis. En esos momentos tenemos la oportunidad más maravillosa de entregarnos por completo en sus brazos y decirle: «Estoy cansado… He luchado en mis fuerzas y ya no puedo más».

Sabemos que no existe prueba tan grande que tú y yo no podamos soportar. O sea, Dios conoce tu capacidad de dolor y sabe cuánto puedes resistir.

Recuerda, a Dios sí le puedes creer.

Un Día a la Vez Copyright © by Claudia Pinzón
Darnos por vencidos en la vida es cerrarles las puertas al cambio. Un divorcio, una enfermedad, una pérdida, un despido repentino de un trabajo, un hijo que se va de casa, tener un familiar en la cárcel o, más aun, en las drogas… ¡Qué terrible!

Standing Strong Through the Storm - SUFFERING CAN MAKE OUR LIVES MORE HOLY


SUFFERING CAN MAKE OUR LIVES MORE HOLY

Our fathers disciplined us for a little while as they thought best; but God disciplines us for our good, that we may share in his holiness.
~ Hebrews 12:10 (NIV)

Christmas is a time of peace and joy for those who are fortunate enough to celebrate the birth of their Savior in freedom. For Marko and his two fellow believers it was the fifteenth Christmas that they had to celebrate behind the bars of a prison cell in a Muslim country.

The next day some colleagues felt they had to visit Marko and his friends as an encouragement and confirm to them once again the love of Immanuel—God with us.

Even though they often heard the saying that a prison cell in the Middle East is the closest to hell that you will experience on earth, nothing prepared them for the sense of hopelessness that they experienced in that waiting room of despair.

As the prisoners entered, it was not difficult to recognize Marko and his two friends. Beaming eyes and smiling faces immediately assured them Marko and friends knew they had not been separated from the love of God.

Tears flowed freely as they shared how lonely they were on Christmas day and how joyful they were to know that they were not forgotten.

“It was so difficult yesterday.” Marko spoke softly. “Apart from being Christian prisoners in a Muslim prison, it was also a fast day of Ramadan. We were not allowed out of our cells and we were not allowed to talk to anyone. Fortunately, a week ago the three of us got hold of pieces of a cake and we hid them underneath our cushions especially for Christmas day. Yesterday, when the fast was broken, we simply walked to one another, held the slices of cake together and said “Merry Christmas!”

The visiting hour flew past and soon it was time to say goodbye. Before being marched back to his prison cell, we looked at Marko and asked him a final question. “What are you going to do when you get to your cell and are once again all alone?

Marko smiled and answered, “I will simply spread the wings of my spirit and fly to Jesus.”

RESPONSE: Today I will seek to understand the biblical principle that suffering makes our lives more holy.

PRAYER: Lord, help me, like Marko, to keep my eyes fixed on You regardless of my circumstances.

Standing Strong Through The Storm (SSTS), a daily devotional message by SSTS author Paul Estabrooks. © 2011 Open Doors International. Used by permission.

Women of the Bible - Potiphar's Wife


Potiphar's Wife

Her character: The wife of a prosperous and influential Egyptian, she was unfaithful and vindictive, ready to lie in order to protect herself and ruin an innocent man.
Her sorrow: To be rebuffed by a slave.
Key Scriptures: Genesis 39

Her Story

We don't even know her name. She is merely presented as the spoiled wife of a prosperous Egyptian official, a miniature Cleopatra, determined to employ her charms to seduce the handsome young Hebrew slave, Joseph.

At the age of seventeen, Joseph was sold into slavery by his half brothers, the sons of Leah. The favorite child of Rachel and Jacob, Joseph seems to have unwittingly done everything possible to ensure his brothers' enmity, even recounting a dream predicting that he, the younger son, would one day rule over them. Envious, the brothers faked Joseph's death and contemptuously sold him to Midianite traders en route to Egypt.

There Potiphar, captain of Pharaoh's executioners, bought the young slave and gradually entrusted him with responsibility for his entire household. Even in his exile, everything Joseph touched prospered, as Potiphar couldn't help but notice.

But the captain of the guard wasn't the only Egyptian impressed by Joseph. His wife had taken special note as well. She made her desire plain enough by inviting Joseph to share her bed. The young slave must have surprised his wealthy mistress with his quick rebuff: "My master has withheld nothing from me except you, because you are his wife. How then could I do such a wicked thing and sin against God?"

From then on, Joseph did his best to avoid her. But with little else to occupy her time and attention, Potiphar's wife simply waited for her next opportunity, which came when Joseph entered the house one day to attend to his duties. Alone with him, she caught hold of his cloak, whispering once again, "Come to bed with me!" But Joseph could not be persuaded and instead fled from her, leaving his would-be seducer alone with her lust, furiously clutching his cloak in her hands.

She wasted no time accusing him of attempted rape. When her husband heard the news, he was outraged, quickly consigning his favorite servant to prison.

The story of Joseph and how God blessed him even in his prison cell, eventually enabling him to become master of the nation he had entered as a slave, is well known to us. But we haven't a clue about Potiphar's wife. Whatever became of her? Did her husband suspect her duplicity? Is that why he merely confined Joseph to prison rather than executing him, as he had every right to do? Compared with Joseph, the story's protagonist, Potiphar's wife was a hollow woman whose soul was steadily decaying through the corrosive power of lust and hate. Surrounded by luxury, she was spiritually impoverished. Empty of God, she was full of herself.

Her Promise

The promise of God is revealed in this story not so much through Potiphar's wife as through Joseph and his response to her. On the surface, if we look at Joseph's situation in this one story, it may appear that he is merely a pawn in the intrigue of the household of Potiphar. As before, he is rejected and tossed aside. He looks like the fool, the loser. However, God's continued blessing is on Joseph. Within the context of this one story, it may look as if Joseph has lost. But in the context of his life, he is nothing but a winner. Indirectly—through Potiphar's wife and her sexual advances toward Joseph—God reveals his promise to bless those who follow him with uprightness (an old-fashioned word, but a good one!) and integrity.

This devotional is drawn from Women of the Bible: A One-Year Devotional Study of Women in Scripture by Ann Spangler and Jean Syswerda. Used with permission.
We don't even know her name. She is merely presented as the spoiled wife of a prosperous Egyptian official, a miniature Cleopatra, determined to employ her charms to seduce the handsome young Hebrew slave, Joseph.

Girlfriends in God - The Lord Really Is My Shepherd (Part 2)


The Lord Really Is My Shepherd
Part 2

Today’s Truth

Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.
~ Hebrews 11:1 (NIV)

Friend to Friend

Valleys are lined with disappointment and discouragement. Some people seem to thrive on adversity, emerging from their valley with greater strength and deeper faith. Others stumble and fall, giving in to discouragement and dropping out of the race. The difference in outcome is determined by the way we choose to handle discouragement.

We must respond to each valley with trust and faith. The word “trust” means “to lie helpless, face down” and is the picture of a servant waiting for his master’s command or a soldier yielding himself to a conquering general. “Heart” refers to “the center of one’s being.” In other words, to trust God completely means that from the very center of our being, from the very core of our existence, we trust Him, totally abandoning ourselves in childlike faith to Him and His plan. We come, holding nothing in our hands, pushing no agenda, with one word in our heart—“whatever!” “Whatever You want me to do, Lord, I will do. Whatever You want me to say, Lord, I will say. Whatever You want me to think, Lord, I will think. Whatever path You have for me, Lord, I will walk.”

If you are like me, you sometimes think you don’t have enough faith. The amount of faith is not nearly as important as the right kind of faith—faith in God alone.

A mustard seed is small but can still take root and grow—just like faith. Faith is also like a muscle. The more we use it, the stronger it becomes.

We must remember that faith doesn’t rest on what we have done but on what Christ has done. As Paul says, times of stress accentuate the presence and power of God.

“We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they are good for us—they help us learn to endure. And endurance develops strength of character in us, and character strengthens our confident expectation of salvation. And this expectation will not disappoint us. For we know how dearly God loves us because He has given us the Holy Spirit to fill our hearts with His love” (Romans 5:3-5, NLT).

When the valleys come, we are tempted to abandon our faith and strike out in our own strength. What we should do is embrace our faith in God, look for our Shepherd, and follow Him.

The story is told of a shepherd who tried to persuade his sheep to cross a swiftly flowing stream. Since sheep are naturally afraid of rapidly running water, the shepherd couldn’t get them to cross. Then he had an idea.

Picking up a lamb, the shepherd stepped into the river and carried it to the opposite shore. When the mother saw that the shepherd had safely led her lamb across the stream, she forgot her fear and stepped out in faith and into the rushing current. Soon, she was safely on the other side. The rest of the flock followed.

Faith rests in what Christ has already done on the cross and in our lives.

Faith hopes for what God will do for us in the future.

Faith builds on the victories of yesterday to help us face the valleys of today and the questions about tomorrow.

Faith in God is sure and certain, believing that God is who He says He is and that He will do what He says He will do. When we believe that God will fulfill His promises, even though we can’t see a single promise materializing, we are exercising faith.

Faith does not bypass pain. It does, however, empower us to deal with pain. Faith steps up to the bat and invites the opponent to throw his best pitch. Sometimes faith strengthens us, and other times, surprises us. Great faith is forged in the deepest valleys, beginning where our strength and power end.

Let’s Pray

Father, I want to be a woman of faith, but I am so weak and so often afraid. Today, I choose against fear. Instead, I choose to believe You and Your Word. Please help me learn how to reject the lies of the enemy and celebrate the absolute truth of Your Word.
In Jesus’ Name,
Amen.

Now it’s Your Turn

One of my favorite descriptions of faith is:

F: forsaking
A: all
I: I
T: trust
H: Him

How would you define faith? _______________________________________________

Read Hebrews 11:6 and record it in your journal. Then write the verse in your own words.

Hebrews 11:6 “And without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him.”

More from the Girlfriends

Our faith is tested when the storms of life hit. Are you sitting in a rocking boat that you fear is about to capsize? Mary has a message of hope for you! Check out her book, Hope in the Midst of Depression and discover how to find strength and the courage to face the trials in your life.

Be sure to check out the FREE MP3s on Mary’s website and connect with Mary through E-mail, Twitter, Instagram, Shopify, or on Facebook.

Seeking God?
Click HERE to find out more about how to have a personal
relationship with Jesus Christ.

Girlfriends in God

http://girlfriendsingod.com/events/
Valleys are lined with disappointment and discouragement. Some people seem to thrive on adversity, emerging from their valley with greater strength and deeper faith. Others stumble and fall, giving in to discouragement and dropping out of the race. The difference in outcome is determined by the way we choose to handle discouragement.

LHM Daily Devotions - Where Is Your Weak Spot?

https://www.lhm.org/dailydevotions/default.asp?date=20190225

"Where Is Your Weak Spot?"

Feb. 25, 2019

The Lord reigns; let the peoples tremble! ... The King in His might loves justice. You have established equity; You have executed justice and righteousness in Jacob.

Consider for a moment, the infamous Greek warrior Achilles. In Greek mythology, it was prophesied that Achilles would die young. In order to protect her baby, Thetis, the mother of Achilles, brought her child to the river Styx and dipped him into its magical powers of invulnerability while holding only the baby's heel. Thus, Achilles grew up to be a great man of war with only one weakness, his heel, which the magical waters of the Styx did not touch. Yes, you guessed it, in Achilles last battle, his heel was struck by a poison arrow and he died, hence the origin of the phrase, "Achilles' heel," as a reference to any vulnerable spot in any system of armor.

What is America's "Achilles heel"? In a word, liberty. Who does not want liberty and more of it? But liberty is often wrongly defined by a multitude of cacophonous voices who shout, "Liberty is the freedom to do whatever you want, whenever you want, with whomever you want, at any time. No boundaries! No borders!" Is this the essence of the American dream? Such liberty is nothing new. Peter declared long ago that false teachers would arise in the church who promised "freedom" but were themselves "slaves of corruption, for whatever overcomes a person, to that he is enslaved" (2 Peter 2:19b). Now if this condition can arise in the church, how much more can such corruption arise in any system of government?

Liberty works differently in God's kingdom. Whoever is yoked to Christ Jesus as His disciple is free from the destructive power of sin, free from eternal death, free from the enslaving curse of sin and free to follow the Lord's will in all things for the rest of his or her earthly life. Liberty in God's kingdom is not a playground of licentiousness for the flesh; rather, it is freedom to pursue God's righteousness. The Lord reigns in righteousness!

True freedom for the Christian in this life is only a beginning. Every Christian has many weak spots. These are areas of corruption from our former way of life that refuse to be tamed and subjugated—stains upon Christ's garment of righteousness given to us (see Jude 23). The weak spots are unrepented sin. What particular sin do you stubbornly refuse to turn away from? Here the real battle begins and ends for the Christian. You know your own heart. I know mine. Enslavement to any sin is conquered at the moment of temptation only when we consciously claim our victory over sin in Christ through the waters of Baptism, day by day, hour by hour, even minute by minute. True faith in Christ is always a struggle. It's both a battle to be waged and a resting in the promises of God that have already overcome all our weak spots, our Achilles' heels, if we would only believe.

The grace of God is greater than my thorn in the flesh, my daily weakness. For when I am weak, then, looking to Christ alone in that moment of weakness, I am strong! (See 2 Corinthians 12:10.)

THE PRAYER: Heavenly Father, teach me to trust You every day, believing that I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Amen.

This Daily Devotion was written by Dr. Mark Schreiber. Use these devotions in your newsletter and bulletin! Used by permission; all rights reserved by the Int'l LLL (LHM).
Consider for a moment, the infamous Greek warrior Achilles. In Greek mythology, it was prophesied that Achilles would die young. In order to protect her baby, Thetis, the mother of Achilles, brought her child to the river Styx and dipped him into its magical powers of invulnerability while holding only the baby's heel.

Devocional de la CPTLN del 25 de Febrero de 2019 - ¿Cuál es tu punto débil?


ALIMENTO DIARIO

¿Cuál es tu punto débil?

25 de Febrero de 2019

¡El Señor reina! Los pueblos tiemblan... Tú, poderoso Rey, amas el juicio; tú confirmas la rectitud; tú has ejercido en Jacob el derecho y la justicia.

Consideremos por un momento al infame guerrero griego Aquiles. En la mitología griega se profetizó que Aquiles moriría joven. Para proteger a su bebé, Tetis, la madre de Aquiles, llevó a su hijo al río Estigia y lo sumergió en sus poderes mágicos de invulnerabilidad sosteniéndolo solo del talón. Así fue como Aquiles se convirtió en un gran guerrero con una sola debilidad: el talón que las aguas mágicas de la Estigia no habían tocado. En la última batalla de Aquiles su talón fue golpeado por una flecha envenenada y murió. De ahí el origen de la frase, "el talón de Aquiles", como referencia a cualquier punto vulnerable en cualquier sistema de armadura.

¿Cuál es "el talón de Aquiles" de los Estados Unidos? En una palabra, la libertad. ¿Quién no quiere tener libertad? Pero la libertad a menudo es definida erróneamente por una multitud de voces que gritan: "Libertad es poder hacer lo que uno quiera, cuando quiera, con quien quiera, tanto como quiera. ¡Sin límites! ¡Sin fronteras!"¿Es esta la esencia del sueño americano? Tal libertad no es nada nuevo. Pedro declaró hace mucho tiempo que surgirían falsos maestros en la iglesia que prometerían "libertad" pero que ellos mismos "son esclavos de la corrupción, pues todo aquel que es vencido, se vuelve esclavo del que lo venció" (2 Pedro 2:19b). Ahora, si esta condición puede surgir en la iglesia, ¿cuánto más puede surgir en un sistema de gobierno?

En el reino de Dios, la libertad funciona de manera diferente. Quien esté unido a Cristo Jesús como su discípulo está libre del poder destructivo del pecado, libre de la muerte eterna, libre de la maldición esclavizadora del pecado y libre para seguir la voluntad del Señor en todas las cosas por el resto de su vida terrenal. La libertad en el reino de Dios no es un campo de juego para que la carne explore; más bien, es para perseguir la justicia de Dios. ¡El Señor reina en justicia!

La verdadera libertad para el cristiano es solo un comienzo. Cada cristiano tiene muchos puntos débiles, áreas de corrupción de nuestra forma de vida anterior que se niegan a ser domesticadas y subyugadas. Los puntos débiles son pecados no arrepentidos. ¿De qué pecado particular te niegas obstinadamente a alejarte? Tú conoces tu propio corazón. Yo conozco el mío. La esclavitud a cualquier pecado es vencida en el momento de la tentación solo cuando conscientemente reclamamos nuestra victoria sobre el pecado en Cristo a través de las aguas del Bautismo, día a día, hora a hora, incluso minuto a minuto. La verdadera fe en Cristo siempre es una lucha. Es tanto una batalla que debe librarse, como un descanso en las promesas de Dios que ya han superado todos nuestros puntos débiles, nuestros talones de Aquiles, si tan solo creemos.

La gracia de Dios es mayor que cualquier espina en la carne, mi debilidad diaria. Porque cuando soy débil, Cristo es mi fuerza (ver 2 Corintios 12:10).

ORACIÓN: Padre celestial, enséñame a confiar cada día en ti, creyendo que todo lo puedo en Cristo que es quien me fortalece. Amén.

Dr. Mark Schreiber

© Copyright 2019 Cristo Para Todas Las Naciones. Que a través de estos devocionales, la Palabra de Dios te refresque en tu diario caminar.
Consideremos por un momento al infame guerrero griego Aquiles. En la mitología griega se profetizó que Aquiles moriría joven.

Notre Pain Quotidien - L’esprit de Fika

https://www.ministeresnpq.org/2019/02/25/lesprit-de-fika/

L’esprit de Fika

Lisez : Luc 24.28-35
La Bible en un an : Nombres 9-11 ; Marc 5.1-20

Pendant qu’il était à table avec eux, il prit le pain ; et, après avoir rendu grâces, il le rompit, et le leur donna. V. 30

Il y a le café Fika près de chez moi. Ce mot suédois équivaut à faire une pause café et pâtisserie, toujours en famille, avec des collègues ou entre amis. Même si je ne suis pas Suédoise, l’esprit de fika évoque en moi l’une des choses que j’aime le plus chez Jésus : il prenait le temps de s’arrêter pour manger et se détendre avec d’autres personnes.

Selon des érudits, Jésus ne prenait pas ses repas au hasard. Le théologien Mark Glanville les appelle « le succulent “deuxième plat” » des festins et des célébrations d’Israël dans l’Ancien Testament. À table, Jésus vivait ce que Dieu avait prévu qu’Israël serait : « un milieu de réjouissances, de célébrations et de justice pour le monde entier ».

Du repas aux 5000 convives à la sainte Cène – en passant par le repas pris avec deux croyants après sa résurrection (LU 24.30) – le ministère culinaire de Jésus nous invite à interrompre notre course incessante pour nous reposer en lui. Rappelons-nous que ce n’est qu’après avoir mangé avec Jésus que les deux croyants ont reconnu en lui le Seigneur ressuscité : « [Il] prit le pain ; et, après avoir rendu grâces, il le rompit, et le leur donna. Alors leurs yeux s’ouvrirent » (V. 30,31) et ils ont reconnu le Christ vivant.

Assises récemment au Fika à déguster un chocolat chaud et des brioches, une amie et moi nous sommes mises à parler de Jésus, le pain de vie. Puissions-nous nous attarder à sa table et l’y découvrir davantage.

Prenez le temps de manger le pain de vie.


© 2019 Ministères NPQ
Il y a le café Fika près de chez moi. Ce mot suédois équivaut à faire une pause café et pâtisserie, toujours en famille, avec des collègues ou entre amis. Même si je ne suis pas Suédoise, l’esprit de fika évoque en moi l’une des choses que j’aime le plus chez Jésus : il prenait le temps de s’arrêter pour manger et se détendre avec d’autres personnes.