Monday, June 25, 2018

Exploring the Parables with Cap'n Kenny - The Parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector


The Parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector

Luke 18:10-14
10 “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. 11 The Pharisee stood by himself and prayed: ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people—robbers, evildoers, adulterers—or even like this tax collector. 12 I fast twice a week and give a tenth of all I get.’ 13 “But the tax collector stood at a distance. He would not even look up to heaven, but beat his breast and said, ‘God, have mercy on me, a sinner.’ 14 “I tell you that this man, rather than the other, went home justified before God. For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.”

THINK ABOUT IT
“God, have mercy on me, a sinner.” This passage alludes to Psalm 51 and influenced prayer in the early church. Particularly among the desert fathers, this became a repeated prayer that was eventually called “the Jesus Prayer.” Some versions of the prayer read, “Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me, a sinner.” The act of repetitive prayer was one of the earliest contemplative expressions of Christianity. Saint Hesychius the Priest wrote, “Truly blessed is the man whose mind and heart are as closely attached to the Jesus Prayer and to the ceaseless invocation of his name as air to the body or flames to the wax.”

TALK ABOUT IT
What did this parable teach you about repentance?
O Lamb of God, who, both by your example and precept, instructed us to be meek and humble, give me grace throughout my whole life, in every thought, and word, and work, to imitate your meekness and humility. Mortify in me the whole body of pride; grant me to feel that I am nothing and have nothing, and that I deserve nothing but shame and contempt, but misery and punishment. Grant, O Lord, that I may look for nothing, claim nothing; and that I may go through all the scenes of life, not seeking my own glory, but looking wholly unto you, and acting wholly for you.

Let me never speak any word that may tend to my own praise, unless the good of my neighbor requires it; and even then let me beware, lest, to heal another, I wound my own soul. Let my ears and my heart be ever shut to the praise that comes from men.

Give me a dread of applause, in whatsoever form, and from whatsoever tongue, it comes. Deliver my soul from this snare of hell; neither let me spread it for the feet of others. Whosoever perishes thereby, let their blood be upon their own head, and let not my hand be upon them.

O giver of every good and perfect gift, if at any time you please to work by my hand, teach me to discern what is my own from what is another’s, and to render unto you the things that are yours. As all the good that is done on earth you do it yourself, let me ever return to you all the glory. Let me, as a pure crystal, transmit all the light you pour upon me; but never claim as my own what is your sole property. Amen.
In Jesus,
Cap'n Kenny

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What did this parable teach you about repentance?

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